Energy drinks like Rip-It and Wild Tiger may be essential fuel for hard-charging U.S. service members, but they're only exacerbating mental health issues and behavioral issues, according to a new study in Military Medicine.

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Benjamin Franklin nailed it when he said, "Fatigue is the best pillow." True story, Benny. There's nothing like pushing your body so far past exhaustion that you'd willingly, even longingly, take a nap on a concrete slab.

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And no one knows that better than military service members and we have the pictures to prove it.

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Photo via DoD

Sitting in his air-conditioned hotel room, Petty Officer 2nd Class Marcus Salmon began sweating profusely.

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Task & Purpose photo

Wild Tiger, the Iraq War’s most iconic energy drink, was just banned in Kurdistan. Why? The Kurdistan Health Ministry is concerned about the adverse side effects of overconsumption of energy drinks, ranging from rapid heart rate to, well, death.

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Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jb Jaso

“We’ve all seen them before. The cans, small shots and uniquely packaged drinks that promise to give you an energy boost during the most important parts of your day. At first glance, it seems like a great idea: chug it down and get reinvigorated for the day. But, if you go beyond wanting to simply stay alert and begin to overindulge, you could wind up doing some serious harm to your body.”

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U.S. Army photo

Editor’s Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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