(Associated Press)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Months after becoming president in 2017, Donald Trump began taking meetings with enlisted U.S. service members who deployed to Afghanistan in order to get a better understanding of America's longest war.

"I want to sit down with some enlisted guys that have been there," Trump told advisers, according to the national-security journalist Peter Bergen's latest book, Trump and His Generals: The Cost of Chaos.

"I don't want any generals in here. I don't want any officers," Trump added, according to Bergen's book, which is sourced from dozens of interviews with current and former White House officials and military officers. "I just want enlisted guys."

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Sixteen soldiers from Fort Knox before they take their oath of citizenship. Photo: Eric Pilgrim/Fort Knox

The names, Social Security numbers, and enlistment dates of more than 4,000 immigrant Army recruits were "inadvertently disclosed" in 2017, the Washington Post reported on Monday.

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The Air National Guard has a problem. No, not pilot retention or cockpit safety. This is hotter: A master sergeant reenlisted with a dinosaur puppet on her good swearing hand!

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C. TODD LOPEZ/US ARMY

The morning after Veterans Day, USA Today published an investigation that rippled through the Army community: This August, for the first time since soldier suicides spiked in 2009, the service began offering waivers to recruits with histories of drug and alcohol abuse, depression, bipolar disorder, and “self-mutilating” behaviors like cutting — conditions that previously disqualified would-be enlistees.

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U.S. Navy photo

Military recruiting is growing more difficult by the day, and many lay the blame squarely at the feet of the Millennial generation. But is this actually fair, or is it time for the military to rethink its hiring practices?  

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U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Martin Egnash

Patriotism can be a hard thing to measure. However, most would agree that signing on the dotted line and taking an oath to defend your nation, especially during our longest period of sustained conflict, is a decent marker of love of country. That’s the conclusion the researchers over at WalletHub came to in a June 27 report, “2017’s Most Patriotic States in America.”

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