(Associated Press/Bebeto Matthews)

Editor's note: This article first appeared in 2016

Ask any sailor or Marine who has experienced New York Fleet Week firsthand about their experience, and the first reaction is likely to be a knowing smirk.

Fleet Week comes to New York City for the week surrounding the Memorial Day weekend every spring. Suddenly, a city that has almost no military presence is filled with sailors and Marines in uniform.

I was born and raised in New York City. A visit to the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy as an elementary school kid left an indelible impression: The Navy was really cool. As a teenager, my parents forbade me to go anywhere near sailors during Fleet Week. As a 23-year-old ensign, I experienced Fleet Week in my summer whites as a member of the fleet.

Service members arriving on the half a dozen ships that participate will find that they will be berthed all over the city. My apologies to the ships stuck on Staten Island; you will have to take the ferry to get anywhere fun. The best deal is to be on the big-deck amphibious ship that gets to dock in midtown near Chelsea Piers .

Nearly everything during Fleet Week is free or steeply discounted for service members: Many of the Broadway shows offer free tickets, television programs bring service members into the audience, and the museums are all free.

Service members may also find that their meals and drinks are paid for by other customers, and that cover charges at popular nightlife hotspots are waived — and service members who have overnight liberty may find that the hotel they booked turned out to only be a place to leave a bag.

Here are some tips for surviving Fleet Week in your summer whites.

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John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum only came out on May 17, but the titular hitman is already gearing up to lay siege to theaters in 2021.

On Monday, Lionsgate announced to fans in a cryptic text message that, "You have served. You will be of service. John Wick: Chapter 4 is coming May 21, 2021," according to Polygon.

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Catch-22 is not a heroic war story. But nearly six decades after Joseph Heller's legendary 1961 novel was first published, it remains a poignant and timeless satire of wartime military service.

Catch-22 recently picked up a screen adaptation on Hulu in the form of a six-part miniseries directed by George Clooney, Ellen Kuras, and Grant Heslov, with each director overseeing two episodes. Ahead of the series premiere on May 17, Task & Purpose had a chance to screen Hulu's Catch-22.

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Clifton Webb (center) as Royal Navy Lt. Cmdr Ewen Montagu inspecting a corpse for Operation Mincemeat in the 1956 movie 'The Man Who Never Was'

One of the greatest feats of espionage in modern military history is getting a silver screen treatment for the first time in more than 60 years with a little help from the one of the writers of HBO's The Pacific.

Variety reports that the World War II-era deception plot known as Operation Mincemeat is getting a movie starring Oscar-winner Colin Firth, directed by John Madden, and written by the Emmy-nominated Michelle Ashford, whose credits include The Pacific and Masters Of Sex.

"In the context of World War II narratives, the story of Operation Mincemeat is unique – a bizarre and seductive cinematic blend of high-level espionage and ingenious fiction, where the stakes could hardly be higher," Madden told Variety.

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Here be dragons (HBO)

Following the epic siege of Winterfell, the Game of Thrones episode "The Last of the Starks" confronts its protagonist Daenerys Targaryen with wrenching military dilemmas that might have been ripped from today's headlines—and issues on the ethical issue of force that remain highly controversial today.

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Troops deployed to Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan await the start of the movie 'Avengers: Endgame' on May 1. Walt Disney Company Chairman and CEO Robert Iger agreed to send the blockbuster film to air bases in Afghanistan and Qatar after Hurlburt Field military spouse Kat Lancaster asked him via Twitter to make the movie available to those deployed troops. (Area Support Group-Afghanistan via Northwest Florida Daily News)

HURLBURT FIELD — The smiles say it all, shining through the darkness of a movie theater at Afghanistan's Bagram Airfield. Dozens of airmen, shown in an official photo, eagerly await the start of "Avengers: Endgame," the culmination of nearly two dozen massively popular superhero movies in Marvel Studios' "Avengers" franchise.

The smiles, though, came courtesy of another kind of hero — Kat Lancaster, a Hurlburt Field military spouse whose heartfelt Twitter plea prompted the chairman and CEO of the Walt Disney Company, parent of Marvel Studios, to get "Avengers: Endgame" to troops in Afghanistan and Qatar within a couple of days of its opening weekend.

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