President Donald Trump (Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

The United States was forced to extract a top secret source from Russia after President Donald Trump revealed classified information to two Russian officials in 2017, CNN reported.

A person directly involved with the discussions told the outlet the U.S. was concerned that Trump and his administration routinely mishandled classified intelligence and that their actions could expose the covert source as a spy within the Russian government.

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(Reuters/Lisi Niesner)

DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran announced on Monday it had captured 17 spies working for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and sentenced some of them to death, deepening a crisis between the Islamic Republic and the West.

Iranian state television published images that it said showed the CIA officers who had been in touch with the suspected spies.

In a statement read on state television, the Ministry of Intelligence said 17 spies had been arrested in the 12 months to March 2019. Some have been sentenced to death, according to another report.

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(Reuters/Henry Nicholls)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department unveiled 17 new criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Thursday, saying he unlawfully published the names of classified sources and conspired with and assisted ex-Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning in obtaining access to classified information.

The superseding indictment comes a little more than a month after the Justice Department unsealed a narrower criminal case against Assange.

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A Huawei logo is pictured during the media day for the Shanghai auto show in Shanghai, China April 16, 2019. (Reuters/Aly Song)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump issued an executive order Wednesday giving his administration sweeping powers to block Chinese telecom giant Huawei Technologies Co. and other foreign communications firms from doing business in the United States — a long-anticipated move he had postponed while Washington and Beijing were in intense trade negotiations.

The White House said the president was taking the action to "protect America from foreign adversaries who are actively and increasingly creating and exploiting vulnerabilities in information and communications technology infrastructure and services in the United States."

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Chelsea Manning speaks at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, U.S., March 13, 2018. (Reuters/Suzanne Cordeiro)

Chelsea Manning, a former U.S. Army intelligence analyst and source for online publisher WikiLeaks, could be jailed again if she refuses to comply with a new grand jury subpoena, said a U.S. law enforcement source, as well as Manning herself.

After 62 days in prison, Manning was released last Thursday. She had been locked up for refusing to comply with a grand jury subpoena for testimony in an investigation into WikiLeaks by U.S. prosecutors in Alexandria, Virginia.

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Clifton Webb (center) as Royal Navy Lt. Cmdr Ewen Montagu inspecting a corpse for Operation Mincemeat in the 1956 movie 'The Man Who Never Was'

One of the greatest feats of espionage in modern military history is getting a silver screen treatment for the first time in more than 60 years with a little help from the one of the writers of HBO's The Pacific.

Variety reports that the World War II-era deception plot known as Operation Mincemeat is getting a movie starring Oscar-winner Colin Firth, directed by John Madden, and written by the Emmy-nominated Michelle Ashford, whose credits include The Pacific and Masters Of Sex.

"In the context of World War II narratives, the story of Operation Mincemeat is unique – a bizarre and seductive cinematic blend of high-level espionage and ingenious fiction, where the stakes could hardly be higher," Madden told Variety.

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