(U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Kara Handley/Released)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Two California-based sailors have been recognized for extraordinary heroism during a nighttime raid on a remote underground Islamic State group hideout, where the pair fought off 20 terrorists and shielded their comrades from grenades and enemy fire.

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technicians 1st Class Christopher Greene and Travis Holland were each presented with the Bronze Star with combat "V" device last week at Naval Outlying Landing Field Imperial Beach, California. They were recognized for their actions during a Sept. 18 mission in Iraq's Anbar province while assigned to Special Operations Task Force-West.

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Army photos.

Two soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice in Afghanistan have been identified by the Pentagon as Special Forces Master Sgt. Micheal B. Riley, 32, and Sgt. James G. Johnston, 24.

Riley, who was on his sixth deployment to Afghanistan, was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Fort Carson, Colorado, defense officials said on Thursday. Johnston served with the 79th Ordnance Battalion (Explosive Ordnance Disposal), 71st Ordnance Group at Fort Hood, Texas, defense officials announced.

Both were killed by small arms fire on Tuesday during combat operations in Uruzgan Province, Afghanistan, a Defense Department news release says. A total of nine U.S. troops have been killed in Afghanistan so far in 2019.

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An Air Force explosive ordnance disposal technician returns from a manual approach to an improvised explosive device training scenario June 25, 2015, in Southwest Asia. (U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brittany E. Jones)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The pilots who fly the Air Force's fighters and bombers, the crew members who keep them in the air, and the controllers who guide them are all focused on getting ordnance to targets. The Air Force's explosive ordnance disposal technicians, however, are part of a small cadre whose job is to find and eliminate ordnance on battlefields or at home.

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Left, Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay; right, Spc. Joseph P. Collette (U.S. Army/Facebook)

The Department of Defense on Saturday identified the two soldiers who were killed in Afghanistan's Kunduz Province on Friday as an explosive ordnance disposal tech and a Green Beret.

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M-16A4 service rifles are stacked against a wall after urban operations training on Marine Corps Outlying Landing Field Atlantic, North Carolina, Feb. 18, 2016. 2D Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion conducted the training in preparation for deployment with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jodson B. Graves/Released)

Two Army explosive ordnance disposal soldiers have been indicted for allegedly trying to sell dozens of rifles, pistols, and C4 explosives to undercover federal agents in El Paso, Texas.

Tyler James Sumlin and Jason Wayne Jarvis showed up at a truck stop in El Paso, Texas on Nov. 14, 2018 and met with undercover agents from Homeland Security Investigations before following them to a nearby warehouse where they had agreed to exchange weapons for $75,000, according to a criminal complaint filed Nov. 15, 2018 in the Western District of Texas.

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U.S. Army photo

The Army National Guard is investigating whether a member of an explosive ordnance disposal unit killed by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in October was appropriately trained and equipped prior to his deployment, the New York Times reports.

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