An Air Force explosive ordnance disposal technician returns from a manual approach to an improvised explosive device training scenario June 25, 2015, in Southwest Asia. (U.S. Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Brittany E. Jones)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The pilots who fly the Air Force's fighters and bombers, the crew members who keep them in the air, and the controllers who guide them are all focused on getting ordnance to targets. The Air Force's explosive ordnance disposal technicians, however, are part of a small cadre whose job is to find and eliminate ordnance on battlefields or at home.

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Left, Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay; right, Spc. Joseph P. Collette (U.S. Army/Facebook)

The Department of Defense on Saturday identified the two soldiers who were killed in Afghanistan's Kunduz Province on Friday as an explosive ordnance disposal tech and a Green Beret.

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M-16A4 service rifles are stacked against a wall after urban operations training on Marine Corps Outlying Landing Field Atlantic, North Carolina, Feb. 18, 2016. 2D Low Altitude Air Defense Battalion conducted the training in preparation for deployment with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit.

(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Jodson B. Graves/Released)

Two Army explosive ordnance disposal soldiers have been indicted for allegedly trying to sell dozens of rifles, pistols, and C4 explosives to undercover federal agents in El Paso, Texas.

Tyler James Sumlin and Jason Wayne Jarvis showed up at a truck stop in El Paso, Texas on Nov. 14, 2018 and met with undercover agents from Homeland Security Investigations before following them to a nearby warehouse where they had agreed to exchange weapons for $75,000, according to a criminal complaint filed Nov. 15, 2018 in the Western District of Texas.

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U.S. Army photo

The Army National Guard is investigating whether a member of an explosive ordnance disposal unit killed by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in October was appropriately trained and equipped prior to his deployment, the New York Times reports.

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U.S. Army/Sgt. Matthew Keeler

There is no shortage of combat experience among the explosive ordnance disposal soldiers in Fort Bragg’s 28th Ordnance Company.

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The Marine Corps has begun fielding brand-new night vision goggles to Force Reconnaissance and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines, Marine Corps Systems Command announced on Monday, with the goal of achieving full operational capacity by spring 2019.

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