(Photo courtesy of the author)

Editor's note: This story originally appeared in November 2016.

American traditions have changed over time, including how we celebrate holidays. In the modern world, one new tradition is posting old photos to social media. This time of year, that means a deluge of military photos showing up just before Veterans Day. These photos can serve the important purpose of helping our friends understand who has served. But let's be honest: There are some we see over and over and over again. Here are nine profile pictures in your Facebook newsfeed right now.

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When senior military leaders aren't yelling out their office windows for soldiers to stop walking on the grass, they should probably be checking out what they're talking about on social media platforms, according to the top Army general in charge of forces in South Korea.

In a post for On The Green Notebook, a military blog focused on leadership development, Gen. Robert B. Abrams writes that "being engaged on social media is becoming more of an imperative by the day," before listing 10 reasons why others need to get on board.

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(U.S. Army photo)

Editor's Note: The following is an op-ed. The opinions expressed are those of the author, and do not necessarily reflect the views of Task & Purpose.

Last week Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) shared with the country the findings of our two year investigation into foreign trolls who target troops and veterans online, which includes new evidence of foreign-born election interference related to the 2020 presidential campaign.

Macedonians took over and promoted a "Vets for Trump" Facebook page — spreading misinformation about voting along with racist and Islamaphobic propaganda, and engaging in Russian-style election interference, attacking democratic 2020 candidates.

Online entities from Russia, Bulgaria, Ukraine and Vietnam are persistently pretending to be our congressionally chartered veterans service organization — pushing hateful and divisive content alongside VVA-branded material that they're selling on websites which both scrape financial information from troops and veterans, and infect victims' computers with malware.

Trolls from Nigeria have a blossoming criminal empire that involves the identity theft of service members — names and photos of people who serve our country are then used as bait to lure elderly Americans into romance scams, costing some of them their life-savings, which has led several victims to suicide already.

This week, two more disturbing reports were released documenting the increasing dangers of predatory foreign entities online. Oxford University's Computational Propaganda Research Project showed us that at least 70 countries have experienced disinformation campaigns, and that the problem is growing.

Cisco's Talos Intelligence revealed that an imposter website made to look like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's "Hire Our Heroes" was infecting job-seeking troops and veterans' computers with a host of dangerous malware.

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(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Tony Curtis)

Three sailors assigned to the USS George H. W. Bush have died by suicide in the last week, the Navy announced today.

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(Associated Press/Facebook/Photo illustration by Task & Purpose)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

An Illinois congressman in the Air National Guard is pressing Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg to do more to stop "romance scams," especially since many U.S. service members have become targets of the illicit activity.

In a letter sent to Zuckerberg Wednesday, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a Republican, said he is "increasingly concerned" by these scams — where Internet users anywhere in the world claim to be veterans and exploit victims for money — that are consistently perpetuated on the social media platform. He asked Zuckerberg to better weed out fake accounts and improve security of the site to that end.

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Facebook

It started with a simple question: “Any of my Air Force people know this guy?” and a photo of the missing, uhm, individual.

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