Robert L. Barnett III (U.S. Army photo)

A former Fort Bragg soldier has been demoted, dishonorably discharged and sentenced for deserting the military and producing and viewing child pornography, officials said Tuesday.

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The death of a Fort Bragg soldier is currently under investigation, officials said.

Sgt. Matthew D. Joskowitz, 24, of Hackensack, New Jersey, died on Fort Bragg at about 9 p.m. Thursday in a non-training related incident, officials said.

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An entrance sign at Fort Bragg (Wikimedia Commons)

Hollywood producers are planning a movie about a military exorcism that may have taken place on Fort Bragg.

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It was almost midnight when Army Capt. Travis Johnson was driving home from Fort Bragg last February, and came upon an overturned sedan smoldering on an embankment.

Johnson, a physician assistant assigned to the 1st Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at the time, immediately stopped his car and rushed towards the vehicle, yelling out in case anyone was still inside the ticking time bomb.

There was: an injured man was trapped in the driver's seat, and none of the vehicle's doors would open.

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Adam Benaway (Twitter/Falken Tire)

Last year, Fort Bragg soldier Adam Benaway claimed the first place title in his class for the Sports Car Club of America Solo Nationals.

This year, Benaway defended his title to earn first place in his class among more than 60 racers from across the United States and other countries in September at the SCCA's 2019 Nationals in Lincoln, Nebraska.

With more than 1,300 drivers, the Solo Nationals is touted as "the largest amateur motorsports event in the world."

"The competition was tougher as some more talent was drawn to the class after last year's success, but I was able to get it done again," Benaway said.

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gt. Andrew McNeil, left, a public affairs mass communication noncommissioned officer with the 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, XVIII Airborne Corps, discusses his on-post housing concerns with Maj. Tabitha Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Jeremy Crisp, 22nd MPAD command team, during a command visit April 5, 2019, on Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gregory T. Summers / 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Eighty-eight homes at Fort Bragg were flagged for risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

The issue came to officials' attention after one family in the Pope neighborhood at Fort Bragg went to the Womack Army Medical Center showing symptoms consistent with carbon monoxide poisoning, Fort Bragg said in a press release. The family was treated and released the same day, August 4th.

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