(U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Robert Reeves)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A Marine who oversaw the Corps' detachment at a Kansas Army base was removed from his post due last week, officials said on Thursday.

Col. William E. Blanchard, commanding officer of the Marine Corps Detachment at Fort Leavenworth, near the Missouri-Kansas border, was relieved on June 19 following an investigation, said Jessica Hanley, a spokeswoman for his parent command.

The decision was made by Brig. Gen. W.J. Bowers, the head of Marine Corps Education Command, "due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to command," Hanley said.

"The investigation is complete," she added. "No further information is available at this time."

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The Army ignored her warnings about a dangerous colleague. Then he set her on fire

"Everyone knew that it was building up and thought it could get violent."

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Photo Illustration by Paul Szoldra, Task & Purpose/Emilio Küffer

Alone in her office, Katie Blanchard saw him out of the corner of her eye.

It was Clifford Currie, a 54-year-old civilian employee who Blanchard supervised. She couldn't yet see what was in his hands.

For months, Blanchard, then a first lieutenant, had warned her supervisors and coworkers that something would happen to her. She told them that Currie scared her. He would fly off the handle at a moment's notice. He would yell and physically intimidate her.

She told them Currie was dangerous.

Then he did what she said he would.

As Currie stood in the doorway of Blanchard's second floor office at Munson Army Health Center, he pulled out a small clear bottle filled with a brown liquid. His eyes were glazed over and bloodshot as he doused her in gasoline.

Then he lit a pair of matches and threw them on the 26-year-old Army nurse, lighting her on fire.

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Photo via Facebook | Free Clint Lorance

The highly publicized campaign to exonerate Clint Lorance — an ex-Army officer serving a 19-year prison sentence at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, for his role in the slayings of two unarmed Afghans in 2012 — suffered a major setback in late June when the Army Court of Criminal Appeals upheld the former lieutenant’s guilty verdict and denied a petition for a new trial, court documents show. But the fight to free Lorance isn’t over yet.

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Photo via U.S. Army

The U.S. Army pulled a recruitment commercial from TV broadcasts this week after revelations that one of the featured soldiers has since been convicted of raping a 15-year-old girl, according to documents obtained by Business Insider.

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U.S. Army/Staff Sgt. Teddy Wade

The Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, provides the 10-month-long command and general staff officer course. The program serves as an Army officer’s mid-career, graduate-level, professional military education and fulfills congressional, Joint, and Army requirements for officer development. Over the past few years, however, it received some considerable criticism over how it’s structured and operated.

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