Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher dodged the most serious charges the Navy threw at him during his court martial, but his final sentence could be far worse than what the jury originally handed down.

If the convening authority approves the jury's sentence of four months' confinement and a reduction in rank from E7 to E6, Gallagher will be busted down to the rank of E1, according to Navy officials.

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(Associated Press/Gregory Bull)

SAN DIEGO — The Navy SEAL who raised nearly $750,000 from a community of supporters to successfully fight war crimes charges in a San Diego court-martial is again asking for the public's help for one more round with the Navy.

Chief Eddie Gallagher, through an attorney, is asking the public to help him persuade a Navy admiral to reduce his jury-imposed punishment for posing with the body of a dead Islamic State fighter in 2017.

Specifically, he's looking for other service members who have received punishment for taking photos with dead enemy combatants — and received a lesser sentence.

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Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

A military jury sentenced Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher to a reduction in rank to E-6, along with four months confinement and forfeiture of pay on Wednesday.

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REUTERS/Mike Blake

President Donald Trump said in a congratulatory tweet on Wednesday morning that he was "glad he could help" Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher, a day after Gallagher was found not guilty of murder but found guilty of posing for a photo with a corpse.

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Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

The jury in the military trial of Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher has found him not guilty of premeditated murder and attempted murder during a deployment to Iraq in 2017.

He was, however, found guilty of unlawfully posing for a picture with a human casualty.

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Paul Szoldra/Task & Purpose

NAVAL BASE SAN DIEGO — The military judge in the war crimes trial of Navy Chief Eddie Gallagher said that some witnesses offered "inconsistent" testimony, but it was solely up to the jury to "determine the believability" as they deliberate over whether the veteran SEAL murdered a wounded ISIS fighter or shot at innocent civilians in Iraq in 2017.

Both sides in the case presented their closing arguments before a jury of five Marines and two sailors on Monday. They will now decide Gallagher's fate after nearly two weeks of testimony.

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