(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The commandant of the Marine Corps will have five years to stop separating men and women at the service's oldest boot camp, if a new amendment added to the 2020 defense authorization bill survives to ratification.

Rep. Jackie Speier, a California Democrat and chair of the House Armed Services Military Personnel subcommittee, proposed the amendment on Wednesday, which would prohibit gender-segregated training at the Marine Corps recruit depots.

"Training at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, South Carolina, may not be segregated based on gender," the measure states. "The Commandant of the Marine Corps shall carry out this subsection not later than five years after the date of the enactment of this Act."

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The Army is opening up more assignments for female officers in the infantry, armor and field artillery occupations at another five major posts this year, the Army announced last week.

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Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Some men and women attending Marine Corps boot camp are training more closely together than ever, but the training is unlikely to be fully integrated, the service's top general said this week.

Marine Corps leaders are currently reviewing the performance of the first-ever coed company that lived, trained and graduated together in March. In some areas, they performed better than other companies and in other areas worse, Commandant Gen. Robert Neller told Military.com at the Sea-Air-Space conference outside Washington, D.C.

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Male and female Marine recruits could once again train together at Parris Island next year, said Lt. Gen. David Berger, who has been nominated to be the Corps' next commandant.

On March 29, the male and female Marines in India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion graduated from Parris Island. The company had one female platoon and five male platoons, marking the first time the Marine Corps had integrated men and women into the same training unit.

Overall, India Company did "very well" in terms of how recruits performed physically and how many were injured, Berger said at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday.

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Capt. Michael Bruce, outgoing commander of Echo Battery, Battalion Landing Team, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, hands the battery guidon to 1st Lt. Jessi Wieck during a Change of Command ceremony at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, Japan, April 12, 2019. (U.S. Marine Corps/Gunnery Sgt. T. T. Parish)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Justice Department has appealed a Texas judge's ruling that the country's male-only draft registration system is unconstitutional.

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Seaman Calsea Clemens of the Coast Guard Cutter Galveston Island (WPB 1349) mans the rail and renders honors to the USS Missouri and USS Arizona in Pearl Harbor while on their final underway trip March 9, 2018. The Galveston Island is a 110-foot Island-class patrol boat has been in service since 1992 and was originally homeported in Apra Harbor, Guam. (U.S. Coast Guard/Chief Petty Officer Sara Muir)

One of the U.S. Coast Guard's earliest female officers is urging women to "remain strong and tough" as the service tries to find ways to encourage them to stay.

Women are leaving the Coast Guard at higher rates than men — which means fewer at higher ranks.

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