(Reuters/Kevin Lamarque)

SEOUL (Reuters) - The United States looks set to break a promise not to hold military exercises with South Korea, putting talks aimed at getting North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons at risk, the North Korean Foreign Ministry said on Tuesday.

The United States' pattern of "unilaterally reneging on its commitments" is leading Pyongyang to reconsider its own commitments to discontinue tests of nuclear weapons and intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), the ministry said in a pair of statements released through state news agency KCNA.

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(Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Department of Energy)

The U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff in mid-June 2019 briefly published the Pentagon's official doctrine on the use of nuclear weapons. The joint chiefs quickly pulled the document — Joint Publication 3-72, Nuclear Operations — from the public website.

"The document presents an unclassified, mostly familiar overview of nuclear strategy, force structure, planning, targeting, command and control and operations," commented Steven Aftergood, an analyst with the Federation of American Scientists.

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(Reuters/itar-TASS/presidential Press Service photo)

U.S. intelligence agencies suspect that Russia has been secretly conducting low-yield nuclear weapons tests in violation of an international treaty prohibiting this type of testing.

"The United States believes that Russia probably is not adhering to its nuclear testing moratorium in a manner consistent with the 'zero-yield' standard," Director of the US Defense Intelligence Agency Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley wrote in his prepared remarks for a talk at the Hudson Institute Wednesday, The Wall Street Journal reported, adding that the other intelligence agencies have arrived at similar conclusions as DIA.

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U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands as they hold a joint news conference after their meeting in Helsinki, Finland, July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Leonhard Foeger/File Photo

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke for more than an hour on Friday, discussing the possibility of a new nuclear accord, North Korean denuclearization, Ukraine and the political situation in Venezuela, the White House said.

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Here are the key takeaways on President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty: It's Russia's fault; if an arms race ensues, it's still Russia's fault; it will be a long time before the United States could field its own missiles; and the United States has no interest in developing new nuclear missiles, senior administration officials said on Friday.

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