Caro, 355th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, partakes in obedience training at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, Sept. 23, 2019. (U.S. Air Force/Airman 1st Class Kristine Legate)

Seems hard to believe, but the U.S. Air Force says it's having a hard time finding homes for retired military working dogs.

Read More Show Less
Gaya, an explosive detection dog with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, awaits a command. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Dalton S. Swanbeck)

U.S.-trained bomb-sniffing dogs sent to ally Jordan are losing their will to work and dying due to improper care, a recently released Department of State inspector general evaluation found.

The U.S. has been sending these specially trained dogs to Jordan for years as part of the extensive Explosive Detection Canine Program (EDCP). Since 2008, at least 10 of the dogs have died from medical problems. Other canines were found to be living in unhealthy conditions that the IG report characterized as "disturbing."

"Canines lose their effectiveness when their quality of life is poor," the report read.

Read More Show Less
Yeager, an improvised explosive device detection dog, waits for the beginning of a memorial service in honor of Lance Cpl. Abraham Tarwoe, a dog handler and mortarman who served with Weapons Company, 2nd Bn., 9th Marines, on April 22, 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps/ Cpl. Alfred V. Lopez)

In 2012, Lance Cpl. Abraham Tarwoe and his dog, Sgt. Yeager, were patrolling the Marjah district of Iraq.

A Marine had been injured by an IED, an improvised explosive device, so the pair were looking for other bombs in the area.

Suddenly, Tarwoe stepped on a buried IED, and it exploded, killing him.

Yeager suffered shrapnel wounds that took months to recover from and cost him part of his right ear.

Ninety-two military working dogs died in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2001-13, according to a study in Military Medicine. Roughly one in four died from explosions, the second leading cause of death after gunshot wounds.

Yeager was awarded a Purple Heart for his injuries after serving three combat tours and over 100 detection patrols.

Now, the 12-year-old Labrador retriever is going to Hollywood, where he will be honored as the nation's top military dog and will compete for the title of American Hero Dog.

Read More Show Less
(U.S. Postal Service)

It's a doggy dog world for the United States Postal Service.

The United States federal government's independent postal agency officially released a new set of Forever Stamps in honor of the nation's brave and loyal canines with the Military Working Dogs on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Sully the service dog of former U.S. President George H.W. Bush lays in front of Bush's casket as it lies in state inside the U.S. Capitol Rotunda on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 4, 2018. (Reuters/Jonathan Ernst/File Photo)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Lifting his thick paw to shake, former President George H.W. Bush's service dog took an oath to serve at Walter Reed National Medical Center on Wednesday, embarking on a new job helping disabled American veterans and active-duty service members.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.