New York National Guard Soldiers and Airmen of the 24th Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team (CST) and 106th Rescue Wing prepare to identify and classify several hazardous chemical and biological materials during a collective training event at the Plum Island Animal Disease Research Facility, New York, May 2, 2018. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Harley Jelis)

The Department of Homeland Security stored sensitive data from the nation's bioterrorism defense program on an insecure website where it was vulnerable to attacks by hackers for over a decade, according to government documents reviewed by The Los Angeles Times.

The data included the locations of at least some BioWatch air samplers, which are installed at subway stations and other public locations in more than 30 U.S. cities and are designed to detect anthrax or other airborne biological weapons, Homeland Security officials confirmed. It also included the results of tests for possible pathogens, a list of biological agents that could be detected and response plans that would be put in place in the event of an attack.

The information — housed on a dot-org website run by a private contractor — has been moved behind a secure federal government firewall, and the website was shut down in May. But Homeland Security officials acknowledge they do not know whether hackers ever gained access to the data.

Read More Show Less

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - North Korea has generated an estimated $2 billion for its weapons of mass destruction programs using "widespread and increasingly sophisticated" cyber attacks to steal from banks and cryptocurrency exchanges, according to a confidential U.N. report seen by Reuters on Monday.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Air Force/Sgt. Brian E. Christiansen

Two Chinese intelligence officers and a group of alleged hackers have been charged in San Diego on accusations of infiltrating the computer networks of private companies in the U.S. and abroad to steal plans for a turbofan engine to be used in commercial airliners, according to the indictment unsealed Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Photo via Twitter

The Marines have fought in every clime and place where they could take a gun. But it turns out they’re pretty good at doing “the cyber,” too.

Read More Show Less
Photo via Associated Press

Trump administration officials “believe” that the White House Chief of Staff John Kelly’s personal cell phone was “compromised” while he was serving as Secretary of Homeland Security, several anonymous U.S. government sources told Politico on Oct. 5. Although the White House claimed the former Marine general only used a secure work phone for government business (which, well, lol), those sources said Kelly “turned his phone into White House tech support this summer complaining that it wasn’t working or updating software properly” — a period of time, officials fear, that “hackers or foreign governments may have had access” to sensitive data from Kelly’s time as one of the nation’s highest law enforcement officers, according to Politico.

Read More Show Less
Public domain

Her family calls Reality Leigh Winner a patriot who may have made some mistakes but acted with conviction for the good of her country. The federal government portrays her as something more sinister — a threat to national security.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.