(Reuters Health) - Young adults who develop PTSD may be more likely to have a stroke by the time they are middle aged, a study of U.S. veterans suggests.

Researchers followed almost one million young and middle-aged veterans of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan for more than a decade, starting when they were 30 years old, on average, and had no history of stroke. Overall, 29% had been diagnosed with PTSD.

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Just days after the Army, Navy, and Air Force announced their Exchanges would no longer sell e-cigarette products, two active-duty soldiers are being treated for vaping-related lung illnesses, according to The Wall Street Journal.

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Changes to the Army Combat Fitness Test were announced on Friday as the service prepares to move into the second phase of implementing the new standard test.

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(Department of Veterans Affairs)

A Vietnam vet stricken with cancer was overrun by ants and bitten more than 100 times days before he died at a VA hospital in Atlanta, his daughter said.

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U.S. Secretary of Defense Dr. Mark T. Esper speaks to members of the press during his first joint press conference with Chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff Gen. Joseph F. Dunford at the Pentagon, Washington, D.C., Aug. 28, 2019. (DoD/ Staff Sgt. Nicole Mejia)

WASHINGTON — The Department of Veterans Affairs will take the lead on improving access to medical care for military members exposed to potentially cancer-causing compounds during their service, Defense Secretary Mark Esper told reporters Wednesday.

In response to a question from McClatchy on the rising number of cancers in the military that could be connected to compounds service members were exposed to while deployed overseas or during training, Esper acknowledged the role of both the Pentagon and VA may grow.

"That is one of the areas where I want to improve and make sure we are doing everything we can to assist soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines as they transition out of the service into the VA system," Esper said.

"VA has the lead on this," he added.

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U.S. Coast Guard Academy Class of 2016 graduates celebrate during their commencement ceremony in New London, Conn., May 18, 2016. (U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Cory J. Mendenhall)

The Coast Guard Academy, which is involved in the most comprehensive concussion study to date, is preparing to track cadets after they leave the academy to examine the impact a concussion can have on a person's brain over time.

The study, launched in 2014 by the NCAA and the Department of Defense, initially looked at the impacts from concussions or repeated head injuries in the hours, days and weeks after the injury, and compared those to assessments done beforehand. Now, it is expanding the study to look at potential cumulative effects.

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