The Army is working on developing an alternate fitness test for soldiers with permanent injuries that prevent them from completing the new Army Combat Fitness Test.

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Hospitalman Jessica Ferguson, left, immunizes Logistics Specialist 1st Class Willson Villavilencio aboard the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Donald Cook (DDG 75). (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Theron J. Godbold)

A viral mumps outbreak that left a deployed U.S. Navy warship quarantined at sea for five months is finally under control.

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A U.S. Soldier assigned to 2nd Battalion, 198th Armored Regiment, 155th Brigade Combat Team, Mississippi Army National Guard, takes a moment to rest during Decisive Action Rotation 17-07 at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., May 30, 2017. (U.S. Army photo)

(Reuters Health) - Voice analysis software can help detect post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans based on their speech, a study suggests.

Doctors have long understood that people with psychiatric disorders may speak differently than individuals who do not have mental health problems, researchers note in Depression and Anxiety. While some previous research points to the potential for distinct speech patterns among people with PTSD, it's been unclear whether depression that often accompanies PTSD might explain the unique voice characteristics.

In the current study, voice analysis software detected which veterans had PTSD and which ones did not with 89 percent accuracy.

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Wyatt Simmons (The Meriden Star)

Staff Sgt. Roy Leverette was pretty blunt: "You're too fat."

Leverette was a recruiter for the U.S. Marine Corps at a career fair when Southeast Lauderdale freshman Wyatt Simmons came up to him and expressed interest in becoming a Marine once he finished high school. At 250 pounds, though, Simmons was told he should join the Army or Navy instead.

"The first thing I look at is physical fitness," Leverette explained. "He came over and I said, plain and simple, 'You're fat. This is not for you.'"

But Leverette read Simmons' face and saw someone who wasn't going to take that kind of statement from anyone. Now a junior, Simmons currently weighs 180 pounds thanks to an overhaul in his diet and fitness regimen. It's helped him as a baseball player for the Tigers, and it's helped him in other areas of life — and it all goes back to being called fat by Leverette when he was a freshman.

"I took offense," Simmons said.

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(Jack Mandaville/Task & Purpose)

Editor's Note: This article by Jim Absher originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Obesity cannot be considered a service-connected disability, according to a new ruling by the Department of Veterans Affairs General Counsel expected to be published in the April 8, 2019, edition of the Federal Register.

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Red River Brewing Company in Shreveport, Louisiana, who brewed the beer to recognize the Louisiana National Guard's 39th Military Police Company. Photo: Staff Sgt. Garrett Dipuma/U.S. Army

That old line about drinking like a sailor isn't bullshit.

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