Marines with Regional Command (Southwest) (RC(SW)) exit a CH-46 Sea Knight helicopter aboard Kandahar Airfield (KAF), Afghanistan, Oct. 27, 2014. (U.S. Marine Corps/Sgt. Dustin D. March)

In 2013, the Department of Defense began an approximately six-year review of 159 mental health programs, many of which were launched after the U.S. invaded Iraq and Afghanistan. According to preliminary DoD records obtained in a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, the DoD found “a large proportion" of these programs did not track spending and were “unable to document evidence of program outcomes."

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U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Devin D. Goodall, precision measurement equipment technician, Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 24, Marine Aircraft Group 24, knocks out his final pull-up during a motivational Marine Corps birthday event on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Nov. 7, 2019. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Marines are putting an "extreme emphasis" on the number of pull-ups leathernecks can do, a recently published internal study found. And that, some fear, could result in other important qualities that are vital to the Corps' mission being overlooked.

Participants in a study on Marine Corps culture were often focused on pull-ups as a best measure of a person's value and worth, researchers found. Marines' ability to lift their own body weight on a pull-up bar was "routinely what Marines referenced when discussing physical standards, a Marine's value, and physical readiness," the report's authors wrote.

One officer interviewed for the study recalled seeing a bunch of cyberwarfare Marines — a specialty the service struggles to retain — leave the Marine Corps because they "ran 26-minute three miles and only did five pull-ups."

"So we told them they were bad Marines," the captain said. "But now they make six figures for Microsoft ... and we don't have any of them for our future cyber fight."

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A 9-year-old advocate named Evan journeyed across New York City while launching a campaign challenging President Trump to go vegan for a month for a reward of giving $1 million to veterans. (Facebook / Million Dollar Vegan)

President Trump's penchant for making deals is legendary, and now a 9-year-old is playing him at his own game.

Evan, a boy who is passionate about animal rights and eats only vegan himself, has challenged the President to do the same for the month of January – in return for $1 million donated to veterans.

"President Trump: I'm Evan, president of Animal Hero Kids, and I'd like to make you an offer," he says in a video posted by a nonprofit, Million Dollar Vegan, the organization that would donate the money. "We will give $1 million to the veterans if you go vegan for January."

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Christopher Montijo (WOFL screenshot)

One Florida man is living proof that you can do anything if you want it badly enough.

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Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

It may take up to five years to finalize the standards for the Army Combat Fitness Test as the service struggles to address the performance gap between male and female soldiers on the service's first-ever gender-neutral fitness assessment.

The Army just completed in late September a year-long field test of the ACFT, involving about 60 battalions of soldiers. And as of Oct. 1, soldiers in Basic Combat Training, advanced Individual training and one station unit training began to take the ACFT as a graduation requirement.

So far, the data is showing "about a 100 to a 110-point difference between men and women, on average," Maj. Gen. Lonnie Hibbard, commander of the Center for Initial Military Training, told Military.com.

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The Air Force is urging airmen to avoid using any products with cannabidiol oil, also known as CBD oil. Why? Because products with CBD oil can make airmen test positive during a urine test for the presence of marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law.

The Air Force announcement comes three months after the Department of Defense reminded service members that CBD use is "completely forbidden."

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