A 9-year-old advocate named Evan journeyed across New York City while launching a campaign challenging President Trump to go vegan for a month for a reward of giving $1 million to veterans. (Facebook / Million Dollar Vegan)

President Trump's penchant for making deals is legendary, and now a 9-year-old is playing him at his own game.

Evan, a boy who is passionate about animal rights and eats only vegan himself, has challenged the President to do the same for the month of January – in return for $1 million donated to veterans.

"President Trump: I'm Evan, president of Animal Hero Kids, and I'd like to make you an offer," he says in a video posted by a nonprofit, Million Dollar Vegan, the organization that would donate the money. "We will give $1 million to the veterans if you go vegan for January."

Read More Show Less
Christopher Montijo (WOFL screenshot)

One Florida man is living proof that you can do anything if you want it badly enough.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

It may take up to five years to finalize the standards for the Army Combat Fitness Test as the service struggles to address the performance gap between male and female soldiers on the service's first-ever gender-neutral fitness assessment.

The Army just completed in late September a year-long field test of the ACFT, involving about 60 battalions of soldiers. And as of Oct. 1, soldiers in Basic Combat Training, advanced Individual training and one station unit training began to take the ACFT as a graduation requirement.

So far, the data is showing "about a 100 to a 110-point difference between men and women, on average," Maj. Gen. Lonnie Hibbard, commander of the Center for Initial Military Training, told Military.com.

Read More Show Less

The Air Force is urging airmen to avoid using any products with cannabidiol oil, also known as CBD oil. Why? Because products with CBD oil can make airmen test positive during a urine test for the presence of marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law.

The Air Force announcement comes three months after the Department of Defense reminded service members that CBD use is "completely forbidden."

Read More Show Less
Pills sit in a disposal container at the 18th Medical Group pharmacy, June 8, 2018, at Kadena Air Base, Japan. (U.S. Air Force/Staff Sergeant Jessica H. Smith)

Claretha Singleton, widow of an Army veteran who died of lung cancer years after exposure to Agent Orange, filled her prescriptions at the Naval Hospital Beaufort for 12 years. Last November, the hospital told her that not only was she not eligible to get her medicine there, but she owed money for all the drugs she'd obtained there previously.

The bill, due in one month: $10,630.

Read More Show Less

A basic trainee just took the Army's new combat fitness test to school.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.