Cmdr. Jesus Cordero, commanding officer of Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily, Italy, was relieved of command Sept. 27. (U.S. Navy photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Investigators probing several allegations of wrongdoing by a Navy officer say they were met with a "disturbing lack of candor," leading them to doubt the validity of the commander's testimony and causing his admiral to question his professionalism.

Cmdr. Jesus "Manny" Cordero, who was relieved of command as the head of Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Sicily last fall, refused to take responsibility for even minor infractions when investigators began looking into several complaints against him, according to a command investigation and endorsement letter, obtained by Military.com through a Freedom of Information Act request.

Vice Adm. Timothy "T.J." White, who relieved Cordero of his duties in September 2018, said the commander made "repeated, vigorous and obvious false statements" during an investigation into his behavior. Those actions severely compromised Cordero's integrity and judgment as a leader," White wrote in a Sept. 27, 2018, relief letter.

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Col. Nicholas Petren, 90th Security Forces Squadron commander, during the 90th SFS change of command ceremony July 6, 2018 in the Peacekeeper High Bay on F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming. (U.S. Air Force/Glenn S. Robertson)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Air Force has removed the commander of the 90th Security Forces Squadron at F. E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming, over a loss of confidence in his ability to maintain a healthy work environment.

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(U.S. Air Force photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The commander of an aircraft maintenance squadron at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, has been removed from his position over "loss of confidence" in his ability to lead the unit, the Air Force said Tuesday.

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(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

A Marine one-star general whom an investigation found to be an abusive and toxic boss has essentially escaped unpunished.

Brig. Gen. Norman Cooling received official counseling as a result of a Defense Department's Inspector General's Office investigation, a defense official said.

Cooling, who had been fired as legislative assistant to the commandant, is now serving as assistant deputy commandant for plans, policies, and operations — marking the pinnacle of his 33-year career in the Marine Corps.

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(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Marine Corps general found to have repeatedly made derogatory statements about women and to have bullied his staff is hitting back against the findings of a months-long investigation into his wrongdoing.

Brig. Gen. Norm Cooling, the assistant deputy commandant for Marine Corps Plans, Policies and Operations, said a 47-page investigation into his time leading the service's legislative affairs office includes "statements attributed to me that I unequivocally did not make or were purposefully embellished."

"At no time during my seven months in the Office of Legislative Affairs, nor at any other time during my 33-year career, have I ever negatively singled out anyone for anything other than their job performance," Cooling told Military.com.

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In his seven months as legislative assistant to the commandant of the Marine Corps, Brig. Gen. Norman Cooling proved to be an abusive, bullying boss, who openly disparaged women, ruled through intimidation, and attempted to spread a rumor about a female officer after the Senate complained about him to the defense secretary, according to a Defense Department's Inspector General's Office investigation.

"The adjectives a majority of witnesses used to describe his leadership were abusive, bullying, toxic, abrasive, and aggressive,"a DoD IG report on the investigation into Cooling's conduct found. "Some subordinates considered him an 'equal opportunity offender,' disparaging men and women. BGen Cooling denied making some of the comments attributed to him, but more than one witness told us they heard him make each of the comments described in this section of our report."

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