There are few things more glorious than the furious BRRRT! of the A-10 Warthog's GAU-8/A Avenger 30mm autocannon laying the law on ground-based foes — and now we know exactly why the sound inspires as much fear in America's adversaries as it does joy in its allies.

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An A-10 Thunderbolt II, assigned to the 74th Fighter Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, GA, returns to mission after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, over the skies of Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, May 8, 2011. (U.S. Air Force/Master Sgt. William Greer)

Fresh off a fraught decade-long rewinging effort, the Air Force's beloved A-10 Thunderbolt II fleet is poised to keep on BRRRTing in the free world for at least another decade — and the beloved attack aircraft will pick up some tasty new upgrades along the way.

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The beloved A-10 Warthog is primed and ready to make close air support great again.

The Air Force has finally installed the last set of new wings for 173 of the service's 283 A-10 Thunderbolt II attack aircraft as part of a $1.1 billion contract with Boeing, Air Force Material Command announced on Monday.

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Editor's Note: This article by Oriana Pawlyk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Members of the 74th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron were accustomed to the conflict conditions of Afghanistan, in which airstrikes aren't often carried out in close quarters.

But one A-10 Thunderbolt II unit summoned into the dense, urban environment of Raqqa, Syria, where Islamic State fighters and snipers hid within buildings, found itself testing new ways to support U.S.-backed militia on the ground, contributing to the city's liberation in late 2017.

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The A-10 is a flying death machine, a plane built around a cannon that is capable of firing 4,200 rounds per minute and eliminating anything in its path, but this fearsome gunship's days are numbered.

Some U.S. Air Force pilots are currently transitioning to flying other aircraft, like the new F-35A Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters that are supposed to replace many of the A-10s for ground attack missions.

Here's what one pilot had to say about the shift during the Air Force's Red Flag air combat exercises.

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