Second Class Petty Officer Association (SCPOA) serve Ice cream and waffles aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Roland John)

You'd expect a force commonly derided as a "Chair Force" to rank pretty high on a list of U.S. service branches by obesity, but apparently the Navy has snatched that king-size throne from the flyboys in the Air Force.

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The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) transits the Atlantic Ocean. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Sawyer Haskins)

The Navy is having its sailors train on an aircraft carrier weapon system that the service is planning to rip out of its Nimitz-class carriers due to its ineffectiveness.

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The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee sharply criticized the Navy's failures with the new USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier, saying that these missteps "ought to be criminal."

During the confirmation hearing for Vice Adm. Michael Gilday, who is set to become the next chief of naval operations, Sen. Jim Inhofe, a Republican from Oklahoma, unleashed a string of criticisms about the first ship of the Navy's Ford-class carriers.

"The ship was accepted by the Navy incomplete, nearly two years late, two and a half billion dollars over budget, and nine of eleven weapons still don't work with costs continuing to grow," the senator said.

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(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Abbate)

It's been just about two years since the twin collisions of the USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain with commercial vessels, and the Navy has made a wild discovery in its quest to improve watchstander performance: sleep matters!

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(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sonja Wickard)

NORFOLK, Va. -- Few things can match training on a warship for a naval battle.

But the Navy believes it's created something even better on shore.

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(Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The Navy secretary is reminding military personnel in his charge that they must remain apolitical, less than a month after the sea services fielded a request from White House officials to hide a ship named for one of President Donald Trump's political rivals, and sailors were photographed sporting patches that mimicked a presidential campaign slogan.

An administrative message released on Friday warns sailors and Marines against activities that "could appear to imply sponsorship, approval or endorsement of a political candidate, campaign or cause."

"Sailors and Marines ... have a long history of supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States," Navy Secretary Richard Spencer wrote. "Now that election season is approaching, it is appropriate for us to remember that, as military professionals, we are an apolitical body."

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