Cmdr. Randolph Chestang, reads his orders during a change of command ceremony in which he relieved Cmdr. Mark E. Postill as Commanding Officer of Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 3 held onboard Naval Outlying Landing Field Imperial Beach Feb. 8, 2018. Chestang was relieved of command in February 2019. (U.S. Navy/Nelson Doromal)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The commanding officer of one of the Navy's coastal riverine squadrons has been fired, service officials announced Thursday.

Read More Show Less

Every once in a while, we run across a photo in The Times-Picayune archives that's so striking that it begs a simple question: "What in the name of Momus Alexander Morgus is going on in this New Orleans photograph?" When we do, we've decided, we're going to share it — and to attempt to answer that question.

Read More Show Less
Honorary Chief Petty Officer Bill Cosby, hospital corpsman, delivers remarks during his pinning ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. in 2011. (U.S. Navy/ Petty Officer 2nd Class Kevin O'Brien)

Bill Cosby is apparently having no trouble adjusting to his life in prison thanks to his service in the U.S. Navy.

Read More Show Less
The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker0

The U.S. Navy has shed light on a previously highly classified project meant to protect aircraft carriers from the grave and widespread threat of torpedos, and it's been a massive failure.

Read More Show Less
The Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) is underway conducting at-sea training with the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group. (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Justin Wolpert)

Two Norfolk-based Navy ships were damaged Tuesday afternoon when they collided during a replenishment-at-sea, U.S. Fleet Forces Command said.

Read More Show Less
A video screen grab shows the USS South Dakota (SSN 790) at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019, during it's commissioning ceremony. The ship is the Navy's newest fast attack submarine. (U.S. Navy video)

Ninety-two-year-old World War II veteran Richard "Dick" Hackley handed over the watch Saturday to Lt. Ben McFarland, a sailor assigned to the Navy's newest submarine.

Hackley served as a radar operator on the USS South Dakota (BB 57), among the most decorated battleships of the war.

McFarland, known as a plank owner, is among the first to serve on the fast-attack submarine USS South Dakota (SSN 790), which was commissioned at the Naval Submarine Base before a crowd of about 1,400 people. Another 800 watched on a screen from nearby Dealey Center on base.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.