The Navy's beleaguered USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier may not have working weapons elevators, but it's certainly got some moves.

The $13 billion supercarrier on Wednesday returned to Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia after several days of sea trials, a major step for a much-hyped carrier that just spent 15 months undergoing post-shakedown repairs to correct a slew of ongoing technical problems.

But just because only four of the Ford's 11 critical weapons elevators doesn't mean you can't still have fun. According to a fresh batch of photos uploaded to the Defense Visual Imagery Distribution System on Tuesday, the Ford's sea trials included a raucous round of high-speed turns.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

In January, Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer promised President Donald Trump that the Ford's weapons elevators would be fully installed and operational by the time the carrier returned to the open ocean for fresh trials. No word yet on how that's going.

A U.S. Navy F-14 Tomcat aircraft flies a combat mission in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom on Aug. 14, 2004. (U.S. Navy/Staff Sgt. Lee O. Tucker)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Navy aircraft were sidelined as they awaited parts last year that the service actually had in a warehouse. The problem? They didn't even know the warehouse was there.

"Not only did we not know that the parts existed, we didn't even know the warehouse existed," Thomas Modly, the Navy's No. 2 civilian said at last week's annual Military Reporters and Editors conference.

The issue was discovered in last year's Navy- and Marine Corps-wide audit, which Modly said has helped the sea services correct some serious problems tracking inventory it owns.

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As Rep. Elaine Luria sees it, this week's decision to extend the deployment of the USS Abraham Lincoln speaks to a more serious problem with the aircraft carrier fleet, and the evidence is front and center in Hampton Roads.

The Lincoln will remain deployed for an unspecified time because repairs are taking longer than expected on the USS Harry S. Truman, the carrier assigned to replace it.

But at the moment, not one of the Navy's six East Coast carriers — either at Naval Station Norfolk or Newport News Shipbuilding — are close to combat-ready, Luria said in a House Armed Services hearing this week.

So when a single carrier is sidelined longer than expected, it can become a problem.

In an exchange with Navy leaders, the Virginia Beach Democrat said: "So the taxpayers have made a good investment to have six carriers on the East Coast, plus I understand one on the West Coast — seven of our 11 carriers — in a non-deployable status, and we're having to extend the Lincoln on deployment because of one emergent casualty on one carrier? That's where you desire to be?"

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The video opens innocently enough. A bell sounds as we gaze onto a U.S. Navy frigate, safely docked at port at Naval Base San Diego. A cadre of sailors, dressed in "crackerjack" style enlisted dress uniforms and hauling duffel bags over their shoulders, stride up a gangplank aboard the vessel. The officer on deck greets them with a blast of a boatswain's call. It could be the opening scene of a recruitment video for the greatest naval force on the planet.

Then the rhythmic clapping begins.

This is no recruitment video. It's 'In The Navy,' the legendary 1979 hit from disco queens The Village People, shot aboard the very real Knox-class USS Reasoner (FF-1063) frigate. And one of those five Navy sailors who strode up that gangplank during filming was Ronald Beck, at the time a legal yeoman and witness to one of the strangest collisions between the U.S. military and pop culture of the 20th century.

"They picked the ship and they picked us, I don't know why," Beck, who left the Navy in 1982, told Task & Purpose in a phone interview from his Texas home in October. "I was just lucky to be one of 'em picked."

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The USS Zumwalt will "the largest and most technologically advanced surface combatant in the world," according to the Navy — if it ever ends up seeing action.

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Second Class Petty Officer Association (SCPOA) serve Ice cream and waffles aboard the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) (U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Roland John)

You'd expect a force commonly derided as a "Chair Force" to rank pretty high on a list of U.S. service branches by obesity, but apparently the Navy has snatched that king-size throne from the flyboys in the Air Force.

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