Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe / Radio Free Liberty

When Sakhidad started working as a translator for the U.S. military in Afghanistan at the age of 19, he hoped his "faithful and valuable" service would earn him a special U.S. immigrant visa and eventual U.S. citizenship.

In 2011, after two years on the job, Sakhidad applied under a special visa program set up by the U.S. Congress to protect persecuted U.S. allies.

He waited four years for his application to be processed. But the U.S. government never finished reviewing his case.

In the spring of 2015, shortly after the closure of the U.S. base where he'd worked for five years, Sakhidad was abducted, tortured, and killed by the Taliban.

They left his body on the side of a road with a note stuffed in his pocket — a threat addressed to his three brothers saying they would also be killed because they had worked for U.S. forces in Afghanistan.

Read More Show Less
Alaa Mohammed Allawi

(Reuters) - An Iraqi immigrant who worked as a U.S. Army interpreter was sentenced to 30 years in prison on Thursday for dealing the powerful opioid fentanyl over secret online networks, leading to the drug death of a Marine, prosecutors said.

Alaa Mohammed Allawi, 30, who pleaded guilty to drug and weapons charges, was also ordered to forfeit his San Antonio, Texas home, a Maserati sportscar, firearms, jewelry, his stake in a California-based coffee franchise and nearly $50,000 in U.S. and crypto-currencies.

Read More Show Less
Photo: Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP

The man who called himself Eagle labored over his answers.

Becoming an American citizen requires a lot of questions. There's the basic: employment, spouse, family. Then there are the ones that get down to the nitty gritty.

Have you ever been a member of or associated with a terrorist organization? Were you ever involved with genocide? Were you ever a member of, serve in, help or participate in a military unit?

Read More Show Less
No One Left Behind photo by Mica Varga.

When he arrived in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on Dec. 7, with his wife, and five young children, Thomas, an Iraqi translator who served with American troops from 20032006, envisioned new beginnings in their new home.

Read More Show Less
U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill

When Aseel Salman stepped onto the yellow footprints at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina, on July 22, 2013, she took another step down a long road of service to the United States.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.