A Coast Guard Aids to Navigation Team Kodiak boat crew displays their new 38-foot Special Purpose Craft - Training Boat in Womens Bay Sept. 27, 2011. (Coast Guard/Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen)

A collision between a Coast Guard boat and a Navy vessel near Kodiak Island, Alaska on Wednesday landed six coasties and three sailors to the hospital, officials said.

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Roxanne Roellchen interacts with her sons in their family's new home, which they moved into after experiencing roaches, leaks and black mold at another property, at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas U.S. November 16, 2019. (Reuters/Callaghan O'Hare)

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - A U.K. company that provides housing to U.S. military families came under official investigation earlier this year, after Reuters disclosed it had faked maintenance records to pocket performance bonuses at an Oklahoma Air Force base.

At the time, Balfour Beatty Communities said it strove to correctly report its maintenance work. It blamed any problems on a sole former employee at the Oklahoma base.

Now, Reuters has found that Balfour Beatty employees systematically doctored records in a similar scheme at a Texas base.

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Army Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman testified before Congress on Friday that he believed there was "no ambiguity" to what President Trump was asking for on his July 25th call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Vindman, an active-duty Army officer currently working on the National Security Council, told lawmakers that, in the call between President Trump and Zelensky, it was "explicit" what Trump was asking for, according to a transcript of his testimony released on Friday

"I mean, there was no ambiguity, I guess, in my mind. He was calling for something, calling for an investigation that didn't exist into the Bidens and Burisma," Vindman said. "My visceral reaction to what was being called for suggested that it was explicit. There was no ambiguity."

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Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The commanding officer of logistics support battalion based in Japan was removed from his job on Monday amid an ongoing investigation.

Lt. Col. Jeremy Davis, who led 3rd Transportation Support Battalion in Okinawa, was relieved by Brig. Gen. Keith Reventlow "due to a loss of trust and confidence," Marine officials announced on Tuesday. Reventlow is commanding general of 3rd Marine Logistics Group, Davis' parent command.

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A Navy submariner who was fatally shot through the locked front door at a frightened neighbor's house in 2018 "did not kick the door, bang on it, yell, or otherwise show aggressive behavior," according to a Navy "line of duty" investigation that found no misconduct.

Chief Petty Officer John E. Hasselbrink, 41, a fire control technician on the Pearl Harbor submarine USS Illinois, had consumed "at least" seven drinks prior to the April 15 shooting and had a blood alcohol level of 0.25 — three times the legal threshold for driving, the Navy report said.

Hasselbrink arrived by Uber at 3:30 a.m. that Sunday morning and attempted to enter the wrong townhouse 141 feet away from his own in Ewa Beach.

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The mother of a Navy recruit who died after a boot camp run at the Great Lakes base earlier this year said she will seek a second autopsy after a blood disorder was determined to have played a role in her daughter's death.

Kenya Evans said the Navy discovered that her daughter Kierra, 20, possessed the sickle cell trait during a medical exam. Most who have it don't experience symptoms of sickle cell disease — a potentially lethal condition that causes blood cells to deform and clog blood vessels — but they can surface during hard exercise.

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