U.S. Army Cpt. Katrina Hopkins and Chief Warrant Officer 2 James Rogers, assigned to Task Force Warhorse, pilot a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) operation at Camp Taji, Iraq, Dec. 18, 2018. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Javion Siders)

U.S. forces must now ask the Iraqi military for permission to fly in Iraqi airspace for certain missions. However, the U.S. military does not need Iraqi approval to fly close air support and casualty evacuation missions for U.S. troops in combat, a top spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS said.

"In emergency circumstances, CJTF-OIR and the government of Iraq have a process to ensure there would be no delays in transporting injured service members to medical facilities or to provide force protection for any coalition troops,"said Army Col. James Rawlinson, a spokesman for Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve. "For more routine flights, the Government of Iraq has visibility over all CJTF-OIR aviation missions, and we comply strictly with restricted airspace."

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Nearly six months after President Donald Trump declared ISIS defeated, the terror organization is making a comeback in both Iraq and Syria, according to a new report from the Pentagon inspector general's office — and that's largely thanks to the president's decision to prematurely pull the rug out from under local security forces at a critical time.

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(Reuters/Azad Lashkari)

SULAIMANIYA, Iraq (Reuters) - At least three people including a Turkish diplomat were killed in a shooting on Wednesday in the Iraqi Kurdish capital Erbil, Kurdish security officials and Turkey's foreign ministry said.

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The U.S. Embassy in Iraq (Reuters/Lucas Jackson)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad has issued a security alert to U.S. citizens that warns of "heightened tensions" in Iraq and advises against travel to the country.

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An Iraqi security forces member provides security near a patrol base in Mosul, Iraq, June 22, 2017. (U.S. Army/Cpl. Rachel Diehm)

MOSUL, Iraq — It was after dark Wednesday when three buses pulled out of Mosul and headed southeast on a desolate desert road. The passengers were government-backed paramilitary fighters.

The city lights were well behind them when the convoy came under attack. By the time the shooting stopped, six paramilitary members were dead and 31 wounded.

Iraqi authorities quickly identified the culprit: Islamic State.

The attack, one of the deadliest since Iraq declared military victory over the extremist group in December 2017, was the clearest sign yet that the war isn't over.

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President Bush, left, sits with outgoing Sec. of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, right, before the start of their meeting with Senior U.S. Department of Defense Officials on Iraq at the Pentagon, Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006. (Associated Press/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Army's massive history of the U.S. military intervention in Iraq, comprised of two massive volumes and 30,000 pages of declassified documents published by the U.S. Army War College, is a stunning survey of the service's missteps following the 2003 invasion.

But it also provides a clear-eyed look not just at the course of the invasion, but the state of the U.S. political and military apparatus in the run-up to the September 11th attacks — and the hubris that tilted the Pentagon towards invasion.

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