Richard Stayskal and his wife Megan traveled to the nation's capital to testify on the Feres Doctrine, a 1950 legal rule that bars service members from suing the government for negligence and wrongdoing. (Task & Purpose/James Clark)

Members of Congress on Tuesday heard directly from victims of military medical malpractice who are barred from suing the government due to a decades-old Supreme Court precedent known as the Feres Doctrine.

The list of witnesses included service members, veterans, Gold Star family members, and legal experts who offered emotional testimony during a House Armed Services subcommittee hearing on how the legal rule has barred military victims of medical malpractice from legal recourse.

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DoD photo by Glenn Fawcett

The Army general who racked up nearly $3,000 in charges on his government-issued credit card at strip clubs — and also harassed female subordinates while serving as the defense secretary’s top military assistant — will get to keep his security clearance when he retires, USA Today reported Tuesday afternoon. Color me surprised.  

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U.S. Marine Corps photo

The military’s investigation into Marines’ non-consensual distribution of explicit photos of their fellow servicewomen is beginning to take shape. On Thursday, Democratic Rep. Jackie Speier of California announced that the Naval Criminal Investigative Service has identified more than one thousand members of the “Marines United” Facebook group that’s become synonymous with misogyny and sexism in the U.S. armed forces.

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