National security adviser John Bolton holds his notes during a press briefing at the White House, Monday, Jan. 28, 2019, in Washington. (Associated Press/Evan Vucci)

Is the Pentagon gearing up to send a contingent of U.S. service member to South American in response to the ongoing political crisis in Venezuela? Apparently, according to the world's dumbest OPSEC fail.

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The U.S. military has begun withdrawing some cargo but none of the roughly 2,000 troops from Syria, a U.S. official told Task & Purpose on Friday.

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The U..S has started withdrawing troops from Syria on Friday, The New York Times reported, despite the Trump administration saying as recently as this week that they planned to handle it totally differently.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Radio Free Europe/Radio Free Liberty.

The United States has said its decision to withdraw all U.S. troops from Syria was conditional on Turkey ensuring the safety of Kurds in Syria, U.S. national-security adviser John Bolton has said.

Bolton also said on January 6 during a visit to Israel that the U.S. withdrawal was conditioned on defeating remaining elements of the Islamic State (IS) terrorist organization in Syria.

Bolton said there was no timetable for the withdrawal of U.S. forces.

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It appears that Defense Secretary James Mattis’ archenemy is not ISIS or al-Qaeda. Instead, Mattis’ biggest nemesis is National Security Adviser John Bolton – not to be confused with Michael Bolton.

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DOD photo / Army Sgt. Amber I. Smith.

Monday afternoon found Defense Secretary James Mattis diving, dipping, ducking, and dodging as a gaggle of reporters pressed him on whether the focus of the U.S. military mission in Syria  has shifted away from ISIS and toward creating a bulwark against Iran.

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