In the dead of night in September 2012, a U.S. Marine Corps outpost in Afghanistan awoke to the sound of gunfire and explosions. Taliban fighters had infiltrated Camp Bastion and were destroying high-value AV-8B Harrier Jump Jets sitting on the tarmac. The squadron commander of Marine Attack Squadron 211, deployed to Bastion in support of ground operations in Afghanistan, ran towards the sounds of chaos with only a pistol, organizing Marines to repel the attack before he was fatally wounded.

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On August 1st, China celebrated the founding of the People's Liberation Army by allowing some high-resolution photos of the next-generation J-20 stealth fighter to leak, complete with a tasteful photoshopped-on patriotic dragon painting just below the canopy which just screams "Happy Birthday, PLA."

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Lockheed Martin

WASHINGTON — The Navy’s newest fighter jet, the stealthy F-35C, may not have the range it needs to strike enemy targets, the House Armed Services Committee said in a new report, raising troubling questions about whether the multibillion-dollar program is already outpaced by threats.

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U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Cody J. Ohira

Recent comments from the commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Robert Neller, made clear that 2017 was far from a banner year for Marine Corps aviation in terms of safety. The 10 Class A aviation mishaps — mishaps involving manned aircraft — are the most in over a decade. Despite the age of aircraft and operational commitments around the world, the commandant explained that the high rate of aviation mishaps was not generally due to the material condition of the airplanes. The 10 Class A mishaps, where a Class A mishap is defined as an accident that resulted in death, a permanent total disability, or more than $2 million in damage, are reminiscent of another difficult time in aviation safety history. The previous spike in aviation mishaps, in 2004, was a watershed year for aviation safety in the Marine Corps.

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U.S. Air Force photo Staff Sgt. Madelyn Brown

After years of delays and a growing price tag, the Air Force’s F-35A Lightning II is now mission capable.

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Image via screenshot

As further proof that budgetary cuts are taking a toll on the U.S. Air Force, Maj. Gen. James Martin Jr., the Air Force’s deputy assistant secretary for budget, fainted at the podium while discussing the F-35 in the Pentagon Press Briefing Room on Feb. 9. Without missing a beat, Martin’s colleague, the silver-tongued Assistant Air Force Deputy for Budget Carolyn Gleason quipped, “This is what the F-35 will do to you,” before picking up the brief where the good general left off.

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