Military working dog (MWD) Nandi X-284, from the 100th Military Police Detachment, takes part in a scenario based tactical search lane exercise at the Panzer Kaserne range, Boeblingen, Germany on Nov. 26, 2019. (U.S. Army/Rey Ramon)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The US has made the decision to temporarily stop sending explosive-detection dogs to Jordan and Egypt after discovering that a lot of the animals had died as a result of poor treatment, a report from the Department of State's Office of the Inspector General revealed.

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Gaya, an explosive detection dog with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit, awaits a command. (U.S. Marine Corps/Lance Cpl. Dalton S. Swanbeck)

U.S.-trained bomb-sniffing dogs sent to ally Jordan are losing their will to work and dying due to improper care, a recently released Department of State inspector general evaluation found.

The U.S. has been sending these specially trained dogs to Jordan for years as part of the extensive Explosive Detection Canine Program (EDCP). Since 2008, at least 10 of the dogs have died from medical problems. Other canines were found to be living in unhealthy conditions that the IG report characterized as "disturbing."

"Canines lose their effectiveness when their quality of life is poor," the report read.

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US Army

Editor’s Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

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The Islamic State may be receding in Iraq and Syria, but its militants may soon find safe harbor nearby—in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

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Extra Marine Corps security guards have been deployed to U.S. diplomatic posts in light of the protests that have followed President Donald Trump’s decision to move the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, a Marine Corps official confirmed on Monday.

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Photo via DoD

CAMP TITIN, JORDAN - "Now move from the 25 yard line to the 15 yard line," shouts one of the U.S. Marines training soldiers from the 77th Royal Jordanian Marine battalion. An observer can't help but wonder if the football imagery gets lost in translation when it is repeated in Arabic as the Jordanians march forward through the dust. At their new tape mark on the desert floor, they raise their M4 assault rifles and rip apart the quiet, plugging scores of live-fire bullets into wooden targets mounted to a wall of tires beneath the Aqaba Mountains.

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