REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

PANMUNJOM/SEOUL, South Korea (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump became the first sitting U.S. president to set foot in North Korea on Sunday when he met its leader, Kim Jong Un, in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) between the two Koreas and agreed to resume stalled nuclear talks.

The meeting, initiated by a spur-of-the-moment tweet by Trump that Kim said took him by surprise, once again displayed the rapport between the two. But they are no closer to narrowing the gap between their positions since they walked away from their summit in February in Vietnam.

The two men shook hands warmly and expressed hopes for peace when they met for the third time in just over a year on the old Cold War frontier that for decades has symbolized the hostility between their countries, which are technically still at war.

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At some point during the tail end of World War II, a creative engineer at North American Aviation looked at the P-51 Mustang and wrote a memo to his boss stating that if one Mustang was amazing, then two Mustangs merged together by steel and rivets would be possibly the greatest thing to fly, ever. With one cockpit devoted to radar and the other to flying, the F-82 Twin Mustang — nicknamed “double trouble” — was born. What they didn't know was that the Twin Mustang was destined to cement it's place in history over the skies of Korea.  

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The most thoughtful thing I’ve read recently about the Trump-Kim talks is by Arthur Waldron, who teaches at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Twitter/screenshot

There’s trouble brewing for President Donald Trump’s historic, unprecedented, spur-of-the-moment summit with the grandson of a communist revolutionary who carved up the Korean peninsula, along with 37,000 or so American servicemembers, back in the day.

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Korea Summit Press Pool via AP

South Korean President Moon Jae-in met with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Friday in a historic summit that observers have viewed with both trepidation and optimism.

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U.S. Marine Corps

How do you make sense of 2017? Maybe you don’t. But you can’t deny that it was a defining year for the United States military, which got a shiny new chain of command, renewed interest from the U.S. public at large, and a whole lot of weird news day after day. Task & Purpose asked you, our readers, what you thought our community’s biggest stories were this year, and these are the results.

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