A U.S. Army M1A2 Abrams tank is raised over the pier at the Port of Vlissingen, Netherlands, to be lowered onto a low-barge ship for transport elsewhere in Europe, October 12, 2019. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Kyle Larsen)

Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

Since Russia's 2014 incursion in Ukraine, NATO leaders have been focused on securing the alliance's eastern flank.

But defending that boundary and deterring threats to member countries there takes more than just deploying troops. It means moving them in and out, and, if necessary, reinforcing them, and that's something that's always on U.S. and European military commanders' minds.

"I will tell you that when I go to sleep at night, it's probably the last thought I have, that we need to continue to improve upon, and we are, from a road, rail, and air perspective, in getting large quantities of hardware and software from west to east on continent," U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, head of U.S. European Command, said at a Defense Writers Group breakfast in Washington, DC, on Tuesday.

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Lt. Gen. Lee Levy II, Air Force Sustainment Center commander, looks out from the cockpit of a Department of the Navy C-130 undergoing maintenance at Robins on June 25, 2018 (U.S. Air Force/Tommie Horton)

There are good leaders and bad leaders, and then there are leaders whose command climates are so toxic and humiliating that they make deployments seem like a cakewalk. Air Force Lt. Gen. Lee Levy II was in the third category, according to a recent Inspector General report.

The 80-page report was unwavering in its condemnation of Levy, who, as head of the Air Force Sustainment Center based in Tinker Air Force Base, was responsible for nearly 43,000 airmen, multiple supply chain wings and air base wings, and nearly two dozen operating locations both within and outside the continental US. But all that authority couldn't stop those directly under his command from hating his guts.

"I think if he was in the battlefield, he probably would've been shot in the back," said one witness, whose sentiment "was expressed by virtually every member of Lt. Gen. Levy's [redacted]," the report said. In total, 35 of Levy's subordinates and other witnesses were interviewed.

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A squadron of airmen are currently grappling with an unusual task: sending a pair of Dodge Charger chase cars from their current home in New Jersey to the United Kingdom to help U-2 Dragon Lady spy planes land safely.

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After nearly two decades of playing Whack-A-Mole with militant groups across the Middle East and North Africa, the U.S. military appears woefully unprepared for the return of so-called "great power competition" with Russia and China for one simple reason, according to a new assessment: the Pentagon simply can't move personnel and supplies to where they need to go like they used to.

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U.S. Army/taff Sgt. Brendan Stephens

The estimable Rick Maze takes note of them in the September issue of ARMY magazine:

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I’d wager that almost every vet (well, at least those who served in the Army), have a better understanding of logistics than the average civilian. Even though my role in the Army was intelligence, I still had to do logistics, from planning field exercises for my soldiers as a platoon leader, to equipping a company when I was an executive officer. We planned and executed the movement of people and equipment on a daily basis — all aspects of logistics.

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