Airman Apprentice Adonis Hunt, from Lumberton, N.C., cleans rust off chains in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Dec. 13, 2019.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Alexander Williams)

It's a multi-billion scourge that afflicts Navy destroyers, cruise ships and historic vessels like the Queen Mary without fear or favor. It's such a problem that professional organizations and conferences are dedicated to its existence — and its suppression.

It's also on your shower head. The orange stain of metal corrosion may be a nuisance in the bathroom, but on ships, it can be catastrophic. Hulls can collapse, ballast tanks weaken and motors fail, all because of rust. There's no way to fully eradicate it.

The only option: constant vigilance.

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Tech. Sgt. Daniel Caban, 1st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, stands in front of an F-22 Raptor at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Oct. 23, 2019. Caban created Portable Magnetic Aircraft Covers, also known as PMAC, made of fibers that aim to protect the jet intakes from the elements and lower the need for maintenance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Monica Roybal)

Air Force Tech Sgt. Daniel Caban doesn't fly the F-22 Raptor, but his soaring imagination could benefit the stealth fighter all the same.

A maintenance crew chief at Langley Air Force Base, Caban has developed a new way to shield intakes on Raptor jets parked on the ground. It utilizes a flexible cover ringed by a series of magnets that attach firmly to the aircraft.

Langley leaders like what they see. In fact, they want to stoke that innovative fire among more airmen.

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Roxanne Roellchen interacts with her sons in their family's new home, which they moved into after experiencing roaches, leaks and black mold at another property, at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas U.S. November 16, 2019. (Reuters/Callaghan O'Hare)

SAN ANTONIO, Texas (Reuters) - A U.K. company that provides housing to U.S. military families came under official investigation earlier this year, after Reuters disclosed it had faked maintenance records to pocket performance bonuses at an Oklahoma Air Force base.

At the time, Balfour Beatty Communities said it strove to correctly report its maintenance work. It blamed any problems on a sole former employee at the Oklahoma base.

Now, Reuters has found that Balfour Beatty employees systematically doctored records in a similar scheme at a Texas base.

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As boneyards go, this place is pretty lively.

Before many Tucsonans have even started their morning commute, a pair of aircraft mechanics are already crouched over the open cockpit of an F-18 fighter jet, disarming the ejector seat and removing the explosives. Nearby, a towing crew pulls a Navy P-3 anti-submarine aircraft over to the "flush farm" to be drained of its fuel. Then they hook up to a different F-18 and haul it to the "wash rack" for perhaps the last thorough cleaning it will ever get.

Meanwhile, about a mile away, a small army of specialty painters fans out across a dirt lot to spray protective coating on row after row of mothballed C-130 transport planes.

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Navy officials enlisted the help of executives with the Florida-based Carnival Cruise Line, the largest cruise company in the world, to identify solutions for the ongoing maintenance issues that have stranded a majority of the service's aircraft carriers in non-deployable status, Business Insider reports.

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As Rep. Elaine Luria sees it, this week's decision to extend the deployment of the USS Abraham Lincoln speaks to a more serious problem with the aircraft carrier fleet, and the evidence is front and center in Hampton Roads.

The Lincoln will remain deployed for an unspecified time because repairs are taking longer than expected on the USS Harry S. Truman, the carrier assigned to replace it.

But at the moment, not one of the Navy's six East Coast carriers — either at Naval Station Norfolk or Newport News Shipbuilding — are close to combat-ready, Luria said in a House Armed Services hearing this week.

So when a single carrier is sidelined longer than expected, it can become a problem.

In an exchange with Navy leaders, the Virginia Beach Democrat said: "So the taxpayers have made a good investment to have six carriers on the East Coast, plus I understand one on the West Coast — seven of our 11 carriers — in a non-deployable status, and we're having to extend the Lincoln on deployment because of one emergent casualty on one carrier? That's where you desire to be?"

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