Dazed and Confused (1993)

Murphy's law was out in force on Tuesday night, when three civilians triggered a lockdown at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after base security found what looked like explosive ordnance in the backseat of their car which, incidentally, also reeked of weed.

An Explosive Ordnance Disposal team was called to the scene as the civilians were taken into custody, and base traffic was shut down for several hours, base officials said in a statement. But it turns out the ordnance was just a mortar training round, with no explosive material inside, Chuck Anthony, a spokesman for JBPHH, told Task & Purpose.

Read More
Jose Avila, left, and William Kuper, right, were arrested Dec. 30 after allegedly trying to drive through Tinker Air Force Base in a car reeking of weed (Oklahoma County Sheriff's Office)

Two hapless sons of Missouri probably didn't get the memo that just because the Air Force's motto is "Aim High," that doesn't mean you can roll up to the front gate of an air base with your car reeking of weed, with baggies full of pot, a box full of bongs, and a Glock inside.

But that's exactly what Jose Avila, 42, and William Kuper, 30, are alleged to have done on Dec. 30, on their way home from California.

Read More

The Air Force is urging airmen to avoid using any products with cannabidiol oil, also known as CBD oil. Why? Because products with CBD oil can make airmen test positive during a urine test for the presence of marijuana, which is still illegal under federal law.

The Air Force announcement comes three months after the Department of Defense reminded service members that CBD use is "completely forbidden."

Read More
Some dank nugs. (Flickr/Creative Commons/Dank Depot)

SARASOTA, Fla. — With data continuing to roll in that underscores the health benefits of cannabis, two Florida legislators aren't waiting for clarity in the national policy debates and are sponsoring bills designed to give medical marijuana cards to military veterans free of charge.

Read More
(U.S. Army/Sgt. LaShic Patterson)

How We Found Out explores recent reporting from Task & Purpose, answering questions about how we sourced our stories, what challenges we faced, and offers a behind-the-scenes look at how we cover issues impacting the military and veterans community.

Over the last two weeks Task & Purpose has published several stories based on the Army's annual Crime Report for 2018. The expansive report yielded articles on: 10 'known or suspected terrorists' who tried to access Army bases in 2018; and that hundreds of soldiers were able to rejoin the service after being kicked out for 'adverse reasons'; and then there was the soldier who stole a 155mm artillery round during training and nobody noticed for six years.

On Oct. 15, Task & Purpose published its latest piece from the report, which found that marijuana use has shot up in states where weed is legal.

The internal document was provided to Task & Purpose's editor in chief, Paul Szoldra, and given that it offered insight into how the Army tracked and assessed crime in the service in 2018, senior reporter James Clark, spoke with Szoldra to ask how the stories were selected, what additional sourcing was necessary, and how we, as a news team, approach leaked documents.

This is the second installment in the recurring column How We Found Out.

Read More
The Minot Air Force Base main gate (U.S. Air Force photo)

The Air Force is investigating reports that an airman consumed marijuana while assigned to one of the highly-sensitive missile alert facility (MAF) responsible for overseeing Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles at Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota.

Read More
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.