The U.S.-led military coalition fighting ISIS has ruled out friendly fire as the cause of death for Gunnery Sgt. Scott Koppenhafer, a Marine Raider who was killed on Aug. 10 near an Iraqi island on which U.S. and Iraqi forces later dropped 80,000 pounds of munitions, officials confirmed.

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Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Marine special operators are still using the militarized version of a lightweight off-roading vehicle that has reportedly caught fire more than 180 times, killing four people and injuring 30.

Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command has not received any manufacturing recalls on the more than 50 Polaris MRZR vehicles Marine Raiders began using in 2014, said Gunnery Sgt. Lynn Kinney, a command spokeswoman.

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U.S. Marine Corps

The Department of Defense has identified a Marine Raider who was killed in action over the weekend in Iraq.

On Aug. 10, 2019 Marine Gunnery Sgt. Scott A. Koppenhafer, 35, was killed after "being engaged by enemy small arms fire while conducting combat operations" in support of Iraqi Security Forces according to an Aug. 11 statement from the Pentagon. The incident remains under investigation.

He is survived by his wife and two children

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Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was arrested on Jan. 29, 2018. (Photo courtesy of Wilmington Police Department, North Carolina.)

A Marine Raider convicted in a North Carolina court of misdemeanor assault for punching his girlfriend won't spend any time in jail unless he violates the terms of his probation, a court official told Task & Purpose.

On Monday, Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans received a suspended sentence of 60 days in jail, said Samantha Dooies, an assistant to the New Hanover County District Attorney.

Evans must complete 18 months of unsupervised probation, pay $8,000 in restitution, complete a domestic violence offenders program, and he cannot have any contact with his former girlfriend, Dooies told Task & Purpose. The special operations Marine is also only allowed to have access to firearms though the military while on base or deployed.

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A special operations Marine accused of punching his girlfriend will face up to 60 days in jail after being convicted in a North Carolina court of assault inflicting serious injury, a misdemeanor offense, Task & Purpose has learned.

Staff Sgt. Daniel Christopher Evans was also found not guilty of assault on a female, which is also a misdemeanor, said Samantha Dooies, an assistant to the New Hanover County District Attorney.

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