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If you screw up your cashier duties at McDonald’s, chances are your boss won’t smoke you, unless he wants a harassment suit brought against him. In the military world, we live by a different set of rules and laws, one in which we forfeit many of our previously enjoyed rights and freedoms. The U.S. armed forces follow the Uniform Code of Military Justice, a set of legal conventions that was born from the 69 Articles of War in 1775. Although our current rendition of the UCMJ wasn’t signed into law until 1950 by President Harry S. Truman, it sure feels as though some of the punishments contained within its bindings date back to colonial times.

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Flickr photo by Mike Mozart

When two armed men entered a McDonald’s in Besançon, a city in Eastern France near the border to Switzerland, they bit off more than they could chew.

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North Dakota National Guard Public Affairs photo by Sgt Eric W. Jensen

In the modern world, there are jobs and there are professions. There’s no concrete or universally agreed-upon line between the two. Many people would classify jobs that require advanced education or degrees as “professional” jobs. Others take an even more limited definition, only including those jobs with professional associations or guilds, such as doctors, lawyers, or architects as “professionals.” The formal definition, per many dictionaries, highlights two key components. First, one must conform to technical and ethical standards of that profession. Second, one displays a businesslike manner in one’s workplace.

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