As a Medal of Honor recipient, former Army Staff Sgt. David Bellavia will also be eligible for retroactive monthly pension payments stretching back to 2004.

All Medal of Honor recipients receive a pension starting on the date they formally receive the Medal of Honor, which is currently $1,329.58 per month, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

But Medal of Honor recipients are also eligible for a retroactive payment for monthly stipends that technically took effect on the "date of heroism," said Gina Jackson, a spokeswoman for the Department of Veterans Affairs.

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Master Sgt. Roy Benavidez has long been a legend in the Special Forces community and now you can read about the Medal of Honor recipient's bravery in a new graphic novel published by the Association of the U.S. Army.

Benavidez is the subject of AUSA's second Medal of Honor graphic novel. The first was about Sgt. Alvin York and it came out last year.

His story is almost too incredible to believe. Wounded by a land mine in 1965 during his first tour in Vietnam, Benavidez was initially told he'd never walk again. But the tough soldier proved the doctors wrong, requalified for airborne and went on to join Special Forces.

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The White House has announced that former Army Staff Sgt. David G. Bellavia will become the first living Iraq war veteran to be awarded the Medal of Honor.

President Donald Trump will present Bellavia, 43, with the nation's highest military award for valor on June 25 at a White House ceremony.

Army Times reporter Meghann Myers was the first journalist to confirm that Bellavia's Silver Star will be upgraded to the Medal of Honor. During the second battle for Fallujah in 2004, Bellavia single-handedly rescued an entire squad, wiped out an insurgent stronghold and saved several members of his platoon, a White House news release said.

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Editor's Note: This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A former Army staff sergeant who took on enemy fighters at close range, first with an M249 light machine gun and then with a knife, will be the first living veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom to receive the Medal of Honor, Military.com has learned.

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(U.S. Army photo)

Editor's note: this story first appeared in 2017

If you've served in the U.S. Army at some point over the past decade, you've probably heard of Sgt. 1st Class Paul Smith. Within the ranks, his name has become synonymous with extraordinary courage in the face of overwhelming odds. And for good reason.

In April 2003, Smith fought through a hellish firefight, sacrificing his own life to save countless others, becoming the first American service member to earn the Medal of Honor after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

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Robert Maxwell's Medal of Honor is fastened by Mary Spilde, president of Lane Community College, at a ceremony dedicating the Maxwell Student Veteran Center in his honor Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, in Eugene, Ore. Maxwell, 92, of Bend, Ore., was awarded the Medal of Honor for gallantry during World War II. (Associated Press/The Register-Guard/Paul Carter)

Former World War II-era Army communications technician and Medal of Honor recipient Robert D. Maxwell has died at age 98, nearly 75 years after he leapt on a grenade to save his fellow comrades-at-arms during a pitched September 1944 firefight in eastern France.

Maxwell, who was given the U.S. military's highest award for valor in 2012, was the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient in the United States when he died Saturday in the town of Bend, Oregon, according to the Associated Press.

That title now falls to former Army Tech Sgt. Charles H. Coolidge.

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