A military funeral at Fort Jackson National Cemetery in 2014. Photo: Sgt. 1st Class Joel Quebec/U.S. Army

Joseph Williams lived under the Blossom Street Bridge, where 27,000 cars passed over his head every day. His body was found alone on April 1, a day or so after he died of natural causes. He had no family and lived 58 years with virtually no paper trail.

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The U.S. Air Force Honor Guard, the U.S. Air Force Band Ceremonial Brass, and the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard) Caisson Platoon conduct military funeral honors with funeral escort for U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. (ret.) Marcelite Harris in Section 30 of Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia, Feb. 7, 2019./U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser

Arlington National Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 400,000 service members, veterans and their families. The hallowed ground is a symbol of national service, and a shrine to the sacrifices made by those in uniform.

In recent years, there's been a growing push to see a change in what funeral honors are rendered for some of the country's most distinguished heroes: Medal of Honor recipients and prisoners of war. As it turns out, the cemetery has already made some of those changes.

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DoD photo by Tech. Sgt. Kathrine Dodd, U.S. Air Force

Upstate New Yorker Cathy Scoppo was relieved to find that an American flag stolen from her was recovered by Missouri police in Willard County on the Fourth of July.

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