The Air Force has freakin' had it with one of its major private housing providers and has given them 90 days to get their shit together, or else.

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U.S. Army/Scott T. Sturkol, Public Affairs Office

The U.S. Army Inspector General released its investigation report on privatized housing on Thursday, detailing the dismal conditions soldiers and their families have been facing while offering recommendations on how to fix them.

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gt. Andrew McNeil, left, a public affairs mass communication noncommissioned officer with the 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, XVIII Airborne Corps, discusses his on-post housing concerns with Maj. Tabitha Hernandez and 1st Sgt. Jeremy Crisp, 22nd MPAD command team, during a command visit April 5, 2019, on Fort Bragg, North Carolina. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Gregory T. Summers / 22nd Mobile Public Affairs Detachment)

Eighty-eight homes at Fort Bragg were flagged for risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.

The issue came to officials' attention after one family in the Pope neighborhood at Fort Bragg went to the Womack Army Medical Center showing symptoms consistent with carbon monoxide poisoning, Fort Bragg said in a press release. The family was treated and released the same day, August 4th.

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(U.S. Army/Scott Sturkol)

The results of a new Army housing survey show that the overall satisfaction with privatized on-base housing among military families has decreased across the service by almost 6% in 2019.

The report attributes the overall decline to "a combination of growing dissatisfaction coupled with a downward trend in overall resident sentiment upon learning that other residents had similar or greater issues."

The report also attributes to the decline in resident sentiment to "[m]edia reports and cited partner profits."

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(Reuters/Nick Oxford)

NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. Air Force has suspended paying incentive fees at all 21 military housing bases operated by landlord Balfour Beatty Communities following a Reuters-CBS News report that the company falsified maintenance records at an Oklahoma base to help it qualify for millions of dollars in bonuses.

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(Reuters/Nick Oxford)

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A unit of UK infrastructure giant Balfour Beatty plc falsified housing maintenance records at a major U.S. military base to help it maximize fees earned from the Department of Defense, a Reuters investigation found.

At Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma, the company's U.S.-based unit used a second set of books and altered records to make it appear responsive to maintenance requests, Reuters found in a review of company and Air Force emails, internal memos and other documents, as well as interviews with former workers.

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