Rebekah "Moani" Daniel and her husband Walter Daniel. (Walter Daniel/Luvera Law Firm)

The Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition to hear a wrongful death case involving the controversial Feres Doctrine — a major blow to advocates seeking to undo the 69-year-old legal rule that bars U.S. service members and their families from suing the government for injury or death deemed to have been brought on by military service.

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Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar (U.S. Army photo)

NORFOLK, Va. — Michelle Melgar knew her husband was dead before the chaplain showed up at her door.

Army Special Forces Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar was on a difficult deployment to Mali. He told his wife that the Navy SEALs he was working with were acting juvenile and immature.

One morning in June 2017, she woke up and saw that her husband had not texted her. That was extremely unusual.

She texted him "Are you OK?" but received no reply. She got nervous and texted him again. When he didn't reply, she got dressed and waited for her husband's colleagues from Special Forces to officially tell her that he was gone. They showed up soon after Melgar was confirmed dead on June 4, 2017, the result of an attack by four of his special operations colleagues in what has been described as a hazing incident.

On Thursday, one of the four U.S. service members accused of killing Staff Sgt. Melgar apologized to her in person while waiting to learn how long he would spend in prison.

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Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar (U.S. Army photo)

NORFOLK, Va. — Navy Chief Special Warfare Operator Adam Matthews on Thursday pleaded guilty and apologized to the family of Army Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar, a Special Forces soldier who died during a hazing incident in Mali.

Matthews was sentenced to one year in prison, reduction in rank to E-5, and given a bad conduct discharge, although the punitive discharge could be lessened if he testifies against the other service members involved in the case and Melgar's family approves, according to Navy Capt. Michael Luken, the military judge overseeing the case.

Melgar died on June 4, 2017, when Matthews and three other U.S. service members hazed him with the permission of Melgar's team leader.

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U.S. service members have reported a spike in sexual assaults, especially young women, according to a confidential survey released by the Pentagon in February 2019(U.S. Marine Corps photo)

WASHINGTON — Congress could intervene in legal cases on behalf of military members who have been sexually assaulted under a new bill co-sponsored by a bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Rep. Brian Mast.

The Florida Republican in late April introduced "Harmony's Law," named after his constituent Harmony Allen, who was raped by an instructor just three months after joining in the U.S. Air Force in 2000.

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The Navy attempted to use tracking software to spy on civilian and military defense attorneys for two Navy SEALs charged in connection with the death of an Islamic State fighter and a journalist covering the cases, one of the SEAL's attorneys said on Monday.

"You can't do this without a warrant," said Timothy Parlatore, who represents Navy SEAL Chief Eddie Gallagher. "There's a big difference between what a marketing firm can do to check the demographics of its customer base and what the government can do to directly target and track the email communications of a private citizen."

In total, 13 people received an email on May 8 from Navy prosecutor Cmdr. Christopher Czaplak that included an image that, if opened, would have allowed the Navy to see with whom they communicated, Parlatore told Task & Purpose on Monday.

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Two soldiers with the 18th Military Police Brigade, 21st Theater Sustainment Command in Germany were recently punished after they catfished a fellow soldier and shared the soldier's nude photographs with others in their unit

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