Two services. Two incidents involving service members accused of serious misconduct. Two vastly different approaches to openness and transparency.

When U.S. Special Operations Command announced on Wednesday that a SEAL platoon was being sent home early from Iraq because their commander has lost confidence in them, U.S. military officials did not mention that one of the SEALs had been accused of sexually assaulting a female service member. That was first revealed by New York Times reporter David Phillips about 24 hours later.

San Diego-based attorney Jeremiah Sullivan confirmed to Task & Purpose that he represents a member of Foxtrot Platoon SEAL Team 7 who is being investigated for sexually assault but has not been charged.

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(DoD photo/Michael Romeo)

A military officer is reportedly willing to testify before lawmakers that Air Force Gen. John Hyten, who has been nominated to become the next vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sexually assaulted her.

The Washington Post reported on Thursday that the unnamed officer stated she could agree to testify under oath to the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing, which is considering Hyten's nomination, that the Air Force general made unwanted sexual contact with her multiple times, including allegedly sexually assaulting her in December 2017.

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Photo: Dostie's website.

Editor's note: "Formation: A Woman's Memoir of Stepping Out of Line" is a fierce and jarring telling of one woman's experience of war, military sexual trauma and her ensuing PTSD, and working to prove herself in the male-dominated world of the U.S. Army.

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WASHINGTON — Advocates of taking the decision for prosecuting military sexual assaults — a persistent problem within the ranks — outside the chain of command scored a significant victory Wednesday when the House Armed Services Committee approved a pilot program that would do just that at the service academies.

Rep. Jackie Speier, chairwoman of the Military Personnel Subcommittee, pushed through a four-year program that would require the commandants of the service academies to follow the recommendation of an independent prosecutor in cases of sexual assault.

The language triggered familiar objections from Republicans about removing such cases from the chain of command, but ultimately prevailed on a mostly party-line vote.

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The number of U.S. service members who reported being sexually assaulted hit a four-year high in 2018, and at least one base Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program is fighting back with a cartoon skunk.

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The guided missile submarine Florida (SSGN-728) makes her way through Cumberland Sound to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, 11 April 2006. (U.S. Navy/Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Lynn Friant)

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Navy leaders failed to address sailors' safety concerns after a sexually explicit list targeting female crew members surfaced aboard the service's second submarine to integrate women, resulting in the firing of a commanding officer and several other punishments.

A "rape list" was shared by members of the guided-missile submarine Florida's Gold crew, where investigators found "lewd and sexist comments and jokes were tolerated, and trust up and down the chain of command was nonexistent." That's according to a 74-page investigation into the misconduct, obtained exclusively by Military.com through a Freedom of Information Act request.

The Florida, homeported in Kings Bay, Georgia, was the second submarine to integrate enlisted women in February 2018. Capt. Gregory Kercher, who became the Florida Gold crew's commanding officer five months prior, was fired in August for a loss of confidence in his ability to lead.

At least two sailors assigned to the submarine have been separated from the military, and an undisclosed number faced administrative punishment in connection to the list, Navy officials said.

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