(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Stephane Belcher)

The 2020 National Defense Authorization Act would allow service members to seek compensation when military doctors make mistakes that harm them, but they would still be unable to file medical malpractice lawsuits against the federal government.

On Monday night, Congress announced that it had finalized the NDAA, which must be passed by the House and Senate before going to President Donald Trump. If the president signs the NDAA into law, it would mark the first time in nearly seven decades that U.S. military personnel have had legal recourse to seek payment from the military in cases of medical malpractice.

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Nothing sends chills down the spines of senior military leaders quite like the words "continuing resolution."

While Congress and the White House continue battling over a seemingly-endless stream of drama, Washington is watching the clock tick down to Nov. 21 when government funding from the current continuing resolution signed in late September runs out.

And for the Army, a continued delay in funding doesn't just throw a wrench in the wheel — it knocks the wheel completely off and sets it on fire.

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Photo via DoD

After years of shrinking almost everything — from the size of its fleet of airplanes and fighter squadrons to its active-duty forces — the Air Force is looking to expand to meet the increasingly dire threats around the globe, Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson said in an exclusive interview with the Dayton Daily News.

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Photo via DoD

Editor’s Note: This article by Richard Sisk originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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Photo via DoD

A bit of budgetary gamesmanship by the Air Force earlier this month seems to have paid off, as the House Armed Services Committee has allotted money to keep the vaunted A-10 Thunderbolt in the air, according to Defense News.

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DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael R. Holzworth

Military bands form a tradition — a living tradition that continues even today. But budget tightening and fat cutting have put the Pentagon’s continued support of that tradition under a microscope. Entertainment is “just not the role of the military,” Arizona Rep. and retired Air Force Col. Martha McSally recently told the website Politico. As a member of the House Armed Services Committee, she is one of several lawmakers pressuring the Pentagon to take a long hard look at its spending on military bands. And while it’s probably true that military bands should share their equal burden of cuts in an atmosphere of tightening budgets, it’s important to keep in mind the important role they play. Instead of thinking about budget cuts for military bands and simply downsizing, it would be more constructive to think of making them more efficient at what they do.

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