A New York Times report published on Thursday outed the anonymous intelligence community whistleblower at the center of a presidential impeachment inquiry as a CIA officer and provided clues to his identity that will likely make it easier for The White House and other observers to identify him.

Three people familiar with the officer's identity told the Times he is a CIA officer who was detailed to work at The White House and has since returned to the CIA. The report added that, based on the newly-released whistleblower complaint, he "was an analyst by training" who was "steeped in details of American foreign policy toward Europe, demonstrating a sophisticated understanding of Ukrainian politics and at least some knowledge of the law."

As the Times notes, CIA officers routinely work in The White House, often working on the National Security Council or managing secure communications with foreign leaders. But this officer didn't work on the communications team, the Times reported.

That level of detail spurred widespread criticism of the Times from lawyers, intelligence professionals, former government officials, journalists, and others.

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A number of oversights may have contributed to the Oct. 4 death of a U.S. Army National Guard explosive ordnance disposal technician in Afghanistan's Helmand province, the New York Times reports.

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Associated Press photos

Over the weekend I finally sat down to read the big New York Times piece that ran last week on Russian interference in our last presidential election. It takes time—my printout was 30 pages long.

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Associated Press/Carolyn Kaster

I doubt Trump really wants to know who wrote that anonymous op-ed attacking his administration from the perspective of an insider.

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Sam Fellman

On Sunday the NY Times ran one of my occasional surveys of new books on military history and national security issues.

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U.S. Marine Corps

Hearing the sounds of Afghans screaming and looking out at the black smoke of burning tires beyond the perimeter in May 2005, I got my first taste of how poorly researched journalism can have real-world consequences.

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