In a move that could see President Donald Trump set foot on North Korean soil again, Kim Jong Un has invited the U.S. leader to Pyongyang, a South Korean newspaper reported Monday, as the North's Foreign Ministry said it expected stalled nuclear talks to resume "in a few weeks."

A letter from Kim, the second Trump received from the North Korean leader last month, was passed to the U.S. president during the third week of August and came ahead of the North's launch of short-range projectiles on Sept. 10, the South's Joongang Ilbo newspaper reported, citing multiple people familiar with the matter.

In the letter, Kim expressed his willingness to meet the U.S. leader for another summit — a stance that echoed Trump's own remarks just days earlier.

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SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un oversaw the testing of a super-large multiple rocket launcher on Tuesday, North Korean state media KCNA said on Wednesday.

North Korea fired a new round of short-range projectiles on Tuesday, South Korean officials said, only hours after it signaled a new willingness to resume stalled denuclearization talks with the United States in late September.

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REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

North Korea on Saturday fired two short-range ballistic missiles into the Sea of Japan, South Korea's military said, with the apparent weapons test — its fifth in 16 days — flying in the face of U.S. President Donald Trump's jubilant exhortations after receiving another "beautiful letter" from Pyongyang hours earlier.

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(Reuters/Kim Hong-Ji)

SEOUL (Reuters) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said the launch of tactical guided missiles on Tuesday was a warning to the United States and South Korea's joint military drills, state media KCNA said on Wednesday.

The missile launch, the North's fourth such action in less than two weeks, came amid stalled nuclear talks with Washington and U.S.-South Korea military exercises, though the allies played down the tests.

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UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - North Korea has generated an estimated $2 billion for its weapons of mass destruction programs using "widespread and increasingly sophisticated" cyber attacks to steal from banks and cryptocurrency exchanges, according to a confidential U.N. report seen by Reuters on Monday.

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AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit

BANGKOK — The Trump administration was hoping to quietly resume nuclear-disarmament talks with North Koreans at a major Asian summit here this week. But Pyongyang's officials were a no-show, once again snubbing U.S. envoys and casting fresh doubts about President Trump's initiative to persuade Kim Jong Un to shed his ample nuclear arsenal.

Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo attended the annual meeting of a 10-nation bloc of Southeastern Asian countries, which concluded Saturday in Bangkok. And it was expected he would meet with his North Korean counterpart. But Pyongyang's foreign minister, Ri Yong-ho, canceled his trip to Bangkok at the last minute for undisclosed reasons.

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