For more than 50 years, the Defense Department has used 8-inch floppy disks to control the operational functions of the United States' nuclear arsenal — until now.

This past June, the Air Force replaced the floppy disk with a new "highly secure solid state digital storage solution" in the Strategic Automated Command and Control System (SACCS) that coordinates the Pentagon's land-launched nuclear missiles, nuclear-missile-armed submarines and long-range strategic bombers, 595th Strategic Communications Squadron Lt. Col. Jason Rossi told C4ISRNet on Oct. 17.

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

On Monday, The New York Times reported that U.S. officials were considering plans to move the U.S. nuclear arsenal from Inçirlik Air Base in Turkey.

This move would be likely to further deteriorate the tense relationship between the U.S. and Turkey, which has rapidly devolved as Turkey invaded northeastern Syria in assault on the Kurdish forces that fought ISIS alongside the U.S.

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Sometimes a joke just doesn't work.

For example, the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service tweeted and subsequently deleted a Gilbert Gottfried-esque misfire about the "Storm Area 51" movement.

On Friday DVIDSHUB tweeted a picture of a B-2 bomber on the flight line with a formation of airmen in front of it along with the caption: "The last thing #Millenials will see if they attempt the #area51raid today."

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(Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Department of Energy)

The U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff in mid-June 2019 briefly published the Pentagon's official doctrine on the use of nuclear weapons. The joint chiefs quickly pulled the document — Joint Publication 3-72, Nuclear Operations — from the public website.

"The document presents an unclassified, mostly familiar overview of nuclear strategy, force structure, planning, targeting, command and control and operations," commented Steven Aftergood, an analyst with the Federation of American Scientists.

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Indian Wing Cmdr. Abhinandan Varthaman, in the navy blazer, waiting to cross the border into India after being released from Pakistani custody. (Sky News)

Pakistan returned a captured Indian fighter pilot late on Friday, after a dramatic clash between regional rivals that him shot down over the fiercely-contested Kashmir border region.

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U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un sit down before their one-on-one chat during the second U.S.-North Korea summit at the Metropole Hotel in Hanoi, Vietnam February 27, 2019. REUTERS/Leah Millis

HANOI (Reuters) - North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump met in Vietnam on Wednesday for a second summit that the United States hopes will persuade North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons in exchange for promises of peace and development.

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