President Donald Trump has appeared to double down on his claim that the U.S. military's arsenal includes conventional weapons that are more powerful than nukes.

While commemorating the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks Wednesday at the Pentagon, the president warned terrorists that they would be obliterated if they attacked the United States again.

"If, for any reason, they come back to our country, we will go wherever they are and use power the likes of which the United States has never used before," Trump said. "And I'm not even talking about nuclear power. They will have never seen anything like what will happen to them."

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DUBAI/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Iran on Wednesday said it would take another step away from a 2015 nuclear deal by starting to develop centrifuges to speed up its uranium enrichment but it also gave European powers two more months to try to save the multilateral pact.

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Despite President Donald Trump's constant reminders that the U.S. military could quickly and decisively win the war in Afghanistan at the cost of millions of innocent lives, the U.S. government is committed to negotiating with the Taliban rather than atomizing them.

Trump has said several times since July that he could simply destroy Afghanistan if he wanted to. Most recently, Trump stated during his Aug. 26 meeting with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi that, "I've said we can win that war in a very short period of time, but I'm not looking to kill 10 million people, okay?"

Although the president has insisted that he is not talking about a nuclear option for Afghanistan, it is unclear how else the U.S. military would be able to wipe out 10 million Afghans so quickly.

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The Castle Romeo nuclear test on Bikini Atoll on March 26, 1954. (U.S. Department of Energy photo)

President Donald Trump isn't the first person to suggest using nuclear weapon for reasons beyond warfare, and he won't be the last.

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(U.S. Air Force/Associated Press/Photo illustration by Task & Purpose)

Early in the morning of August 6, 1945, a U.S. Air Force B29 bomber, the Enola Gay, took off from the its base in Tinian, near Guam, and headed for the city of Hiroshima in southern Japan.

It was carrying a 9,700 top-secret bomb named Little Boy. Its pilot was Col. Paul W. Tibbets Jr., who led a crew of 12 men on a mission that would change the history of the world.

The plane had been named by Tibbets after his mother.

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Photo: REUTERS/Raheb Homavandi

GENEVA/DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran threatened on Monday to restart deactivated centrifuges and ramp up its enrichment of uranium to 20 percent purity as its next potential big moves away from a 2015 nuclear agreement that Washington abandoned last year.

The threats, made by the spokesman for Tehran's nuclear agency, would go far beyond the small steps Iran has taken in the past week to nudge its stocks of fissile material just beyond limits in the nuclear pact.

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