Photo via DoD

This article by Hope Hodge Seck originally appeared on Military.com, the premier source of information for the military and veteran community.

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Photo via DoD

After a piercing March investigation pointed to the 30,000-member strong “Marines United” Facebook group as ground zero for the Corps’ nude-photo scandal, successor groups immediately sprung up across social media and file-sharing networks to keep explicit photos of unconsenting female service members, veterans, and civilians flowing across the internet. And despite the looming threats of courts-martial and criminal prosecutions, military-connected strains of misogyny and sexism are alive and well — and have turned more vile and vicious online.

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A Marine pleaded guilty on June 29 to nonconsensually sharing nude photos on the Marines United Facebook group, according to a Marine Corps press release.

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Just one week after the the Marine Corps declared that Marines who share nude photos without consent would be punished with mandatory separation, the Navy is following suit.

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Officials with the Naval Criminal Investigative Service have reviewed more than 131,000 images spread across 168 websites as part of the military’s investigation into the non-consensual distribution of explicit photos and videos in the two months since the “Marines United” scandal broke, a congresswoman with knowledge of the investigation has told Task & Purpose.

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