New York National Guard Soldiers and Airmen of the 24th Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Team (CST) and 106th Rescue Wing prepare to identify and classify several hazardous chemical and biological materials during a collective training event at the Plum Island Animal Disease Research Facility, New York, May 2, 2018. (U.S. Army/Sgt. Harley Jelis)

The Department of Homeland Security stored sensitive data from the nation's bioterrorism defense program on an insecure website where it was vulnerable to attacks by hackers for over a decade, according to government documents reviewed by The Los Angeles Times.

The data included the locations of at least some BioWatch air samplers, which are installed at subway stations and other public locations in more than 30 U.S. cities and are designed to detect anthrax or other airborne biological weapons, Homeland Security officials confirmed. It also included the results of tests for possible pathogens, a list of biological agents that could be detected and response plans that would be put in place in the event of an attack.

The information — housed on a dot-org website run by a private contractor — has been moved behind a secure federal government firewall, and the website was shut down in May. But Homeland Security officials acknowledge they do not know whether hackers ever gained access to the data.

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(U.S. AIr National Guard/Senior Airman Jonathan W. Padish)

An Army dental clinic discovered that on three separate days in the last week, it used non-sterilized equipment.

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(U.S. Marine Corps/Pfc. Crystal Druery)

It was getting late, but the Landstown High School student wanted to make sure his uniform looked perfect.

The next morning, senior Cade Anderson would participate in a JROTC drill competition in Prince William county. As his roommate slept, he decided to hang his jacket on a sprinkler head in his hotel room and properly affix all of his ribbons and medals, an attorney said.

When he went to take it back down, the sprinkler activated — resulting in more than $690,000 in damage.

"It's a parent's worst nightmare," attorney Rick Matthews said in an interview.

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An entrance sign at Fort Bragg (Wikimedia Commons)

Fort Bragg officials issued an apology late Thursday, after realizing shutting off power to tens of thousands of post residents created alarm on the post and generated some rather bizarre conspiracy theories in the surrounding community.

This includes suggestions it was a terrorist attack... or a secret Army experiment that shorted out the power grid for miles.

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Sixteen soldiers from Fort Knox before they take their oath of citizenship. Photo: Eric Pilgrim/Fort Knox

The names, Social Security numbers, and enlistment dates of more than 4,000 immigrant Army recruits were "inadvertently disclosed" in 2017, the Washington Post reported on Monday.

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An Oregon Air National Guard F-15C Eagle that made an emergency landing on Wednesday ditched its entire arsenal of live air-to-air missiles before touching down at Portland International Airport, The War Zone reports.

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