Navy Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson’s promotion from White House physician to Secretary of Veterans Affairs may be in jeopardy due multiple claims of poor leadership and on-the-job boozing, but there’s one accusation that may actually make him the perfect man for the job: his alleged propensity for doling out prescription drugs “like candy,” according to one lawmaker.

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CNN/screenshot

There's a serious crisis in America when it comes to opioids. Millions of Americans are addicted to prescription pain relievers, and tens of thousands die from overdoses each year.

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The Washington Post/Getty Images/Ricky Carioti

Two months after President Donald Trump declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, the Department of Veterans Affairs became the first hospital system in the country to publicly release the rates of its opioid prescriptions. On Jan. 11, the VA uploaded the opiate prescription rates of 144 of its medical centers and clinics in an effort to increase transparency over how and at what volume the department administers the addictive pain pills.

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Commons/Matthew Woitunski

As the Senate today deliberated on an emergency funding bill for the Department of Veterans Affairs’ premier private-health program, a new government report is warning of “a significant risk” of addiction and health complications for veterans who are prescribed opioid prescriptions outside the VA.

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Photo via Pixabay

Have you ever noticed how downing a few beers makes you feel invincible? That’s because alcohol, in addition to annihilating your inhibitions, also increases your tolerance to pain while simultaneously dulling it, according to new research.

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Photo via Pixabay

Every day when I leave work, I pop in my earbuds and throw on my favorite playlist. As I walk down the block to catch my train home, my mood steadily improves. While the music drowns out all other sound, I find myself feeling less and less hostile toward the inane actions of fellow commuters, and by the time I get home and throw my phone on the couch, I’m actually happy (weird). But music, it turns out, affects your brain the same way that exercise and taking opioid drugs do: It gets you high.

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