The Marine Corps is loading up one of its experimental unmanned ground vehicle with a buttload of firepower.

The Marine Corps Warfighting Lab is working on a prototype of its tracked Expeditionary Modular Autonomous Vehicle (EMAV) with a remote-controlled .50 caliber machine gun turret and a specialized launcher for kamikaze drones to accompany Marines in urban environments, Military.com reports.

Read More Show Less

Editor's Note: This article by Gina Harkins originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

QUANTICO MARINE CORPS BASE, Virginia -- Textron Systems is working with the Navy to turn a mine-sweeping unmanned surface vessel designed to work with Littoral Combat Ships into a mine-hunting craft armed with Hellfire missiles and a .50-caliber machine gun.

Textron displayed the proof-of-concept, surface-warfare mission package designed for the Common Unmanned Surface Vehicle (CUSV) at Modern Day Marine 2019.

"It's a huge capability," Wayne Prender, senior vice president for Applied Technologies and Advanced Programs at Textron Systems, told Military.com on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
The "Shard" bomb-drone on show at DSEI 2019. (Business Insider/Bill Bostock)

An underwater drone which moves like a squid and can explode on command was one of the stranger weapons on display at a massive arms fair in London this week.

Read More Show Less

There are #squadgoals, and then there are squad goals — and only one of them includes a potential future accompanied by autonomous robots.

Hot on the heels of the Marine Corps's head-to-toe overhaul of infantry rifle squads, a handful of grunts at the Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms, California recently conducted field testing alongside a handful of autonomous surrogate vehicles engineered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Squad X Experimentation program.

Read More Show Less
(Mississippi National Guard/Spc. Jovi Prevot)

A battlefield full of remote-controlled robot battlewagons is closer to reality than you think.

Read More Show Less

The advancements in drone tech are comparable to that of cell phones. It's hard to imagine a time when your portable lifeline to everything (traffic, calendar, family, friends, banking, shopping, eating, yes, we literally mean everything) was the size of a backpack, sat on the center console in a car, and did nothing but make calls — with crap reception to boot — for something like $24.99/minute.

Seemingly overnight, Zack Morris had one at the Max calling his girl Kelly Kapowski to see if she wanted to fool Mr. B. and ditch school (that's a little Saved by the Bell reference for you Millennials out there. Add it to your Netflix binge list and thank us later).

Even then, those phones were the size of a small fish tank. Cheers, 1990s.

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.