Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A Texas-based ammunition company recently unveiled its new 6.8mm cartridge, which the Army will consider for the Next Generation Squad Weapon (NGSW) effort designed to replace the 5.56mm M4A1 carbine and M249 squad automatic weapon in close-combat units.

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Sig Sauer's prototypes for the Army's Next Generation Squad Weapon program (Courtesy photo)

Just days after the Army announced the selection of three defense contractors to whip up prototypes for the service's Next Generation Squad Weapon program, one gunmaker has already unveiled their candidates for the U.S. military's next great service rifle.

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VIDEO: Should the Army go with 5.56mm or 6.68mm ammo for its Next Generation Squad Rifle?

Editor's Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

The U.S. Army has selected three firms to advance to the next phase of testing to select the service's Next Generation Squad Weapon.

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The Army is working to improve its small arms training to better simulate combat by having soldiers engage several targets at once, grab magazines from their pack to reload, and fix weapons malfunctions while on the range, the service recently announced.

"It's exactly what we would do in a combat environment, and I think it's just going to build a much better shooter," Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Fortenberry, the senior enlisted leader at the U.S. Army Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, tasked with overseeing the Army's efforts to update marksmanship training for the first time in decades.

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Sailors from Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 1 conduct category III qualifications on the M2A1 heavy machine gun at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif. CRS-1 is qualifying for future mobilization requirements. (U.S. Navy/Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Kenji Shiroma)

The Navy is considering giving Ma Deuce a quiet new update.

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The U.S. military conducted its first flight test of a conventional ground-launched cruise missile in a test that would have been banned prior to the recent collapse of a Cold War-era nuclear arms agreement.

The missile was launched on Sunday from a testing site on San Nicolas Island in California. "The test missile exited its ground mobile launcher and accurately impacted its target after more than 500 kilometers of flight," the Pentagon explained in an emailed statement, adding that "data collected and lessons learned from this test will inform the Department of Defense's development of future intermediate-range capabilities."

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