"Sir, you failed to use your turn signal... And you're driving a goddamn tank." (Webster Groves Missouri Police Department/Facebook)

Oh, the day after Veterans Day, when your news feed is spilling over with thoughtful op-eds and reflective essays on the costs of war, life after service, and ruminations on whether or not it was worth it.

It's important stuff, absolutely, but I'll admit that I caught myself thinking: You know, today I could really use some silly news. And behold, the internet giveth:

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Editor's Note: This article originally appeared on Business Insider.

The National 9/11 Memorial and Museum's new exhibit, Revealed: The Hunt for Bin Laden, tells the decades-long story of the hunt for one of the world's most notorious terrorists.

Using artifacts from the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Pakistan in 2011, as well as from the CIA and FBI, the exhibit shows how the military and intelligence agencies finally found and eliminated the founder of al-Qaeda.

"This is the first time any of the objects from the bin Laden compound have ever been seen in public," Clifford Chanin, the executive vice president and deputy director for museum programs at the 9/11 Museum, told Insider, adding that the artifacts had just arrived from US intelligence agencies the previous week.

While the artifacts may seem like "humble objects" to some, Chanin said, "the backstory of each of these things is very, very special."

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The Navy's beleaguered USS Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier may not have working weapons elevators, but it's certainly got some moves.

The $13 billion supercarrier on Wednesday returned to Newport News Shipbuilding in Virginia after several days of sea trials, a major step for a much-hyped carrier that just spent 15 months undergoing post-shakedown repairs to correct a slew of ongoing technical problems.

But just because only four of the Ford's 11 critical weapons elevators doesn't mean you can't still have fun. According to a fresh batch of photos uploaded to the Defense Visual Imagery Distribution System on Tuesday, the Ford's sea trials included a raucous round of high-speed turns.

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

(U.S. Navy/Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Connor Loessin)

In January, Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer promised President Donald Trump that the Ford's weapons elevators would be fully installed and operational by the time the carrier returned to the open ocean for fresh trials. No word yet on how that's going.

RACHEL, Nev. (Reuters) - UFO enthusiasts began descending on rural Nevada on Thursday near the secret U.S. military installation known as Area 51, long rumored to house government secrets about alien life, with local authorities hoping the visitors were coming in peace.

Some residents of Rachel, a remote desert town of 50 people a short distance from the military base, worried their community might be overwhelmed by unruly crowds turning out in response to a recent, viral social-media invitation to "storm" Area 51. The town, about 150 miles (240 km) north of Las Vegas, lacks a grocery store or even a gasoline station.

Dozens of visitors began arriving outside Rachel's only business - an extraterrestrial-themed motel and restaurant called the Little A'Le'Inn - parking themselves in cars, tents and campers. A fire truck was stationed nearby.

Alien enthusiasts descend on the Nevada desert to 'storm' Area 51

(Reuters/Jim Urquhart)

Attendees arrive at the Little A'Le'Inn as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 19, 2019

One couple, Nicholas Bohen and Cayla McVey, both sporting UFO tattoos, traveled to Rachel from the Los Angeles suburb of Fullerton with enough food to last for a week of car-camping.

"It's evolved into a peaceful gathering, a sharing of life stories," McVey told Reuters, sizing up the crowd. "I think you are going to get a group of people that are prepared, respectful and they know what they getting themselves into."

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Military service comes with a lot of challenges, from the inherent danger and high stakes of the job to the daily difficulties unique to that line of work.

There's one hardship that doesn't get nearly enough attention: The unending quest to find a suitable profile pic for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and, well, probably dating sites, too. And there's one surefire way to ruin an otherwise epic "thank me for my service" headshot a BFA.

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It may be one of the most important Air Force installations in the continental United States, but Offutt Air Force Base has proven no match for the full fury of the Missouri River.

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