(DoD photo)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

A federal court has ruled that the Department of Veterans Affairs wrongly denied reimbursements to veterans who received emergency medical care at non-VA facilities, a decision that could result in payouts to veterans totaling billions.

Read More Show Less
Donald Trump, then a presidential candidate, speaks to the media on the Turnberry golf course in Turnberry, Scotland, in July 2015. (Associated Press/Scott Heppell)

The Air Force is reviewing how it picks where its crews stay overnight after it was revealed that crews had driven over 50 miles to stay at President Donald Trump's own resort in Scotland, according to a report from Politico.

Read More Show Less
A father comforts his child with an American flag before a naturalization ceremony. (U.S. Marine Corps/Pfc. Nicole Rogge)

Since the confusing rollout of a policy affecting the path to citizenship for some children of U.S. service members and government employees, officials have since attempted to clarify that the change will only effect a small number of people a year.

In the text of the policy update released on Wednesday, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS) said that the policy impacted "children residing abroad with their U.S. citizen parents who are U.S. government employees or members of the U.S. armed forces."

But that's not quite the case, as USCIS officials later clarified: it affects only children who were not U.S. citizens at birth, which means children adopted overseas, and children born to non-U.S. citizen parents.

Let's break this down.

Read More Show Less
A Soldier holds an American flag prior to the start of an oath of citizenship ceremony in the General George Patton Museum's Abrams Auditorium at Fort Knox, Kentucky, Sept. 19, 2018. (U.S. Army/ Eric Pilgrim)

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared onMilitary.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Following the disastrous rollout of a policy this week that delineates U.S. residency requirements for the purpose of U.S. citizenship as it applies to children born abroad, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services on Thursday sought to clarify the changes, saying in a conference call with reporters that its data indicate the measure would have affected only "20 to 25 children a year."

The policy, issued Wednesday, spells out what the department deems residency in terms of U.S. citizenship considerations of offspring born overseas.

Read More Show Less
Maj. Ginger Tate speaks to former Vice President Joe Biden during a rally in South Carolina on Aug. 28, 2019. (Twitter/Bo Erickson)

A major with the South Carolina Army National Guard has highlighted military's struggle to remain apolitical in an intensely partisan environment by telling former Vice President Joe Biden that she is praying that he wins the 2020 presidential election.

Maj. Ginger Tate, assigned to the 228th Theater Tactical Signal Brigade headquartered in Spartanburg, South Carolina, attended a nearby Biden rally while wearing her Army uniform on Wednesday, telling Biden that she waited six years to present either him or former President Barack Obama with a challenge coin that she and her first sergeant had possessed since their Afghanistan deployment.

"When I saw on the news last night that you were coming, I just had to be here," Tate said in a video tweeted by CBS News reporter Bo Erickson. "Thank you so much for your guidance as I took 130 soldiers over. I brought them back and I'm so honored to have served under your administration and your leadership, and I hope and pray that you will be our next president of the United States."

Read More Show Less
U.S. Marines with Fox Company, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment (2/8 Marines), Regimental Combat Team 7 conduct a mission rehearsal at Camp Leatherneck in Helmand province, Afghanistan, May 21, 2013. (U.S. Marine Corps/Cpl. Kowshon Ye)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump said on Thursday that U.S. troop levels in Afghanistan were being reduced to 8,600 but that American forces would remain in the country even if Washington reaches an agreement with the Taliban to end the 18-year war.

"Oh yeah, you have to keep a presence," Trump said in an interview with Fox News radio. "We're going to keep a presence there. We're reducing that presence very substantially and we're going to always have a presence. We're going to have high intelligence."

Read More Show Less
© 2018 Hirepurpose. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service.