(U.S. Army/Sgt. 1st Class Ben Navratil)

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump asked the U.S. Supreme Court to clear his administration to start using Pentagon funds for construction of more than 100 miles of fencing along the Mexican border.

Filing an emergency request Friday, the president asked the justices to lift a freeze on the money while a legal fight with the Sierra Club and another advocacy group plays out.

The request marks the first time the Supreme Court has been confronted with the dispute stemming from Trump's declaration of a national emergency in February to free up federal money for his border wall.

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(DoD photo)

U.S. military veterans may not trust President Donald Trump as commander-in-chief, but that doesn't mean they don't love him anyway.

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An aerial view of the Pentagon building in Washington, June 15, 2005. U.S. Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld defended the Guantanamo prison against critics who want it closed by saying U.S. taxpayers have a big financial stake in it and no other facility could replace it at a Pentagon briefing on Tuesday. (Reuters/Jason Reed JIR/CN)

With Adm. Bill Moran's abdication three weeks before he was due to become chief of naval operations, the Pentagon has yet another vacancy to fill with precious few days left before Congress goes on summer break.

As of Monday, a total of 20 top positions across the U.S. military are vacant, including defense secretary, Air Force secretary, and inspector general, said Heather Babb, a Pentagon spokeswoman.

Two officials have been confirmed by the Senate but have yet to assume their official duties: Christopher Scolese as director of the National Reconnaissance Office and Veronica Daigle as Assistant Defense Secretary for readiness, Babb said.

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(U.S. Army National Guard photo by Pfc. Hannah Baker, 109th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment/Released)

President Donald Trump has vowed that "brand new Sherman tanks" will be on display this July 4th in Washington, D.C., and no one in the military seems to have an idea what the living hell he is talking about.

The "Salute to America" this year is meant to pay tribute to the U.S. military. Speaking to reporters on Monday, the president said the event will showcase the latest fighter aircraft and tanks.

"We have to put them in certain areas but we have the brand new Sherman tanks and we have the brand new Abram tanks," Trump said, according to a pool report.

"You know we're making a lot of new tanks right now. We're building a lot of new tanks in Lima, Ohio – our great tank factory that people wanted to close down until I got elected and I stopped it from being closed down, and now it's a very productive facility and they do, nobody's the greatest tank in the world."

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(U.S. Army photo by Sgt. David Edge, 11th ACR)

It may not be the parade he wanted, but Donald Trump may finally get the chance to show off some of the military's hardware in the nation's capital.

The Defense Department is working on a request from the White House to have static displays of military vehicles and an F-35 flyover for the July 4th "Salute to America" in Washington, D.C., Task & Purpose has learned. No decisions have been made yet about what type of vehicles could be used.

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Photo via Andrew Craft/The Fayetteville Observer/AP

Editor's Note: This article by Patricia Kime originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

FORT BELVOIR, Virginia -- The Army's Court of Criminal Appeals heard arguments Thursday in the ongoing case of Bowe Bergdahl, with the former soldier's attorneys contending that the case should be reconsidered or Berghdahl should be granted clemency because President Donald Trump's comments and tweets tainted the proceedings.

Bergdahl, the soldier who left his post in Afghanistan in 2009 and was held captive by a Taliban affiliate for five years, was sentenced in 2017 to reduction in rank from sergeant to private, forfeiture of $10,000 in pay and a dishonorable discharge.

But he received no prison time -- a decision Trump called Nov. 3, 2017 on Twitter "a complete and total disgrace to our Country and to our Military."

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